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nature & waterways

Some leaves are changing, but most trees are still green

Photos by Tom Rivers: The leaves on the trees at Letchworth State Park are just starting to change colors or reaching midpoint in some areas. The leaves are farther along in northern New York.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 6 October 2018 at 6:58 pm

Beautiful colors for fall foliage are starting to appear around most of the state, according to I LOVE NY. In Orleans County and Western New York, the leaves are just starting to change, according to I LOVE NY.

Near-peak foliage is expected this weekend in some areas of the Adirondacks, while near-peak colors will emerge in the Thousand Islands-Seaway region and parts of the Catskills, according to observers for I LOVE NY.

In Orleans County, spotters in Albion are expecting 25 percent color change with average shades of gold and red starting to pop, I LOVE NY said in its fall foliage report.

Letchworth State Park in Wyoming County, shown this afternoon, will be a hotspot as the colors change on the trees.

Courtesy of I LOVE NY: This is the NY fall foliage map for week of Oct. 3-9.

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Orleans canal communities will work on waterfront revitalization plan

Photo by Tom Rivers: The Holley Canal Park is pictured in June. The site includes a gazebo, public bathrooms with showers, boat tie-ups and camp sites.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 4 October 2018 at 10:40 am

Several canal communities in Orleans County will soon get to work on a waterfront revitalization plan.

The Orleans County Legislature has approved an agreement with NYS Department of State to create the Erie Canal Local Waterfront Revitalization Plan.

The plan will provide a clear direction for suitable future development, reflect a community consensus, and establish a long-term partnership among local governments and the state.

In a resolution last week, the Legislature states, “the Erie Canal was critical to early community settlement and commerce in Orleans County and remains an essential asset for the purposes of economic development, recreation, tourism and cultural heritage.”

The state is providing a $62,000 grant for the plan, while the county contributes $10,000 in cash, and the participating towns and villages pay $10,500. The county Department of Planning and Development will also provide $167 of in-kind services.

The Village of Medina also is working on a Local Waterfront Revitalization Plan and received a $37,500 state grant for the effort. Medina has already formed a committee and hired a consultant, Bergmann Associates.

Medina will have a meeting on Oct. 17 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Medina High School, 2 Mustang Drive, welcoming the public to discuss how to best utilize the waterfront in the community, including the canal, Oak Orchard River and Glenwood Lake.

The Orleans plan will focus on the villages of Albion and Holley, and towns of Murray, Albion, Gaines, Ridgeway and Shelby.

The county expects to hire a consultant and start work on the plan in early 2019. Ken DeRoller, a county legislator, said the two planning efforts will work together.

There may be less than obvious ways to better capitalize on the canal, such as allowing more siphons for farmers to irrigate crops, DeRoller said.

“We are looking forward to enhancing the use of this asset in our county,” he said.

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Reimagined Erie Canal includes beer armada and pocket neighborhoods

Photos by Tom Rivers: Madison County Assistant Planning Director Jamie Kowalczk accepts the $1.5 million first place prize in the Reimagine the Canals competition. Madison County proposed the development of “Pocket Neighborhoods” which would be attractive to millennials, families and seniors who want to live in places that are walkable to shopping, restaurants and other amenities. Kowalczk is joined on stage by Gil C. Quiniones (left), who is president and CEO of the New York Power Authority. Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul also celebrated the winning proposals today.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 3 October 2018 at 10:25 pm

State announces winners of Reimagine the Canals contest

ROCHESTER – A reimagined Erie Canal includes an armada of boats passing along the canal carrying people tasting craft beers. The future also will see some of the open spaces and former industrial areas along the canal turned into “pocket neighborhoods,” which are within walking distance to shopping and amenities.

The State Canal Corp. and New York Power Authority today announced the winners of a Reimagine the Canals competition. The two winners were picked from seven finalists and 145 initial entries.

The $2.5 million competition shows the state isn’t content to have the canal be a historical piece, said Gil C. Quiniones, New York Power Authority president and CEO.

“The message from the governor is clear: the canals still matter,” Quiniones said at today’s announcement.

The second-place winners of the Reimagine the Canals competition walk across the stage at the Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester to accept their award. The Erie Armada team, led by Parks & Trails New York and the event-planning firm Area4 based in New York City will receive $500,000 to implement their proposal. Rory McEvoy, left, is co-founder of Area4 and James Meerdink is project director for Parks & Trails.

The Imagine the Canals competition surpassed its goal of drawing out ideas to better capitalize on the canal system, which Quiniones said is an important asset for economic development, tourism and to support agriculture.

The canal system now falls under the domain of the Power Authority. Quiniones embraced the reimagine competition. NYPA and the Canal Corp. are working on the long-term strategy for the canal, and Quiniones said many of the proposals in the competition may be included in the long-term plan.

Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul is greet by Brian Stratton, director of the State Canal Corp.

Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul said she is optimistic the state will continue to make funding available to help finance some of the initiatives in the Reimagine competition.

The canal, which opened in 1825, was critical in the development of the state and nation. Hochul said the canal did more than move goods.

“It is the flow of ideas,” she said.

Many of the human rights movements, including abolition and women’s suffrage, gained momentum because the canal allowed leaders and residents to promote those ideas.

“It’s the Equal Rights Inspiration Corridor,” she said.

The canal competition put “actionable” ideas for review. The following were the winners:

• Pocket Neighborhoods: The first place entry seeks to build pocket neighborhoods along the Erie Canal and Erie Canalway Trail. Homes would surround a common greenspace and have direct access to the Canal to respond to the growing preference of millennials, families, and seniors to live in a place that is walkable to shopping, restaurants and other amenities.

A pilot project would be built in the Village of Canastota, Madison County, about 25 miles east of Syracuse. The expectation is this project—which would involve a public-private partnership—could be replicated in other communities.

“The pocket neighborhoods project will remind people that the canals are not only a great place to visit but a great place to live,” Quiniones said.

The team, which will receive $1.5 million to further develop its plan, includes the Madison County Planning Department, STREAM Collaborative – an Ithaca architecture and design firm, and Camoin Associates – an economic development consultancy based in Saratoga Springs. The judges cited the project as a model for how land use could be shifted away from the canals’ industrial past to residential and mixed uses.

• Erie Armada: The second winner seeks to create Erie Armada, a multi-day festival and boat race centered on breweries creating human-powered boats that could be made from items common to the industry, such as barrels and beer cans. The race would include parties at the start and end of each 15-mile race that would feature music, local food offerings and craft beverages, including beers created specifically for the armada. The first armada is planned to go between Baldwinsville and Phoenix in Central New York, but other locations are being considered for the future.

Brian Stratton, Canal Corp. director, said the canal is an important asset for the state for tourism, recreation, economic development and agriculture.

The jury commented that the proposal would support new recreation and tourism in the canal corridor and bring a younger audience to the region, while also supporting the local heritage of the canal system. New York was once a leading grower of hops, which were shipped across the nation and abroad via the Erie Canal. The Erie Armada team, led by Parks & Trails New York, event-planning firm Area4 based in New York City and advisor Joe Gustainis of Caledonia, will receive $500,000 to implement their proposal.

New York is home to 400 breweries, up from 95 just six years ago, as well as for the growing number of wineries, distilleries and cideries in the state.

“The canals have long been a source of inspiration and wonder,” said Brian U. Stratton, New York State Canal Corporation director. “The projects that were announced today are poised to make a real difference in how people use and interact with our canals.”

The state announced the Reimagine competition last year. It sought unique ideas to continue to transform the New York State Canal System into an engine of economic activity and a magnet for tourism and recreation.

“With the winners of the Reimagine the Canals competition now selected, we can continue to tap into one of New York’s most underutilized assets and help this statewide resource reach its full potential,” Governor Cuomo said in a statement. “There is no doubt these winning ideas will continue to inspire new, creative ideas that will invigorate the canals and draw visitors to one of our most iconic assets for years to come.”

In all, the competition drew 145 entries from nine states and seven nations, with an international panel of judges—including some of the world’s leading canal experts—narrowing the field to seven finalists.

The competition was held as New York celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Barge Canal—now known as the New York State Canal System—which includes the Erie, Cayuga-Seneca, Champlain and Oswego canals. The state also continues to mark the bicentennial of the Erie Canal, construction on which began 201 years ago. Next year, will mark the 200th anniversary of the first boat trip taken on the Erie Canal, from Rome to Utica.

John Kast, an Albion fruit and vegetable farmer, was featured in a video promoting using the canal to help irrigate farms. That project was a finalist but wasn’t picked for financing.

Other finalists included:

• Go the Distance: this initiative will look to develop overnight accommodations for recreational users of the canal system. The team includes the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor from Waterford, NY; Gray Slate Partners from Troy, NY; 2K Design from Clifton Park, NY and Dorgan Architecture & Planning from Storrs, Conn.

• Canal Winterlocks: seeks to develop winter-time uses for the Erie Canal, potentially including skating, hockey, winter festivals and cross-country skiing. The team includes Clare Lyster Urbanism and Architecture and John Ronan Architects, both from Chicago and Urban Engineers from Philadelphia.

• Intra-Works: installations of art and sculpture to forge a cultural identity that links up the Canal System. The team includes the architecture and planning firms Collective Studio from New York City and WRT and Interface, both from Philadelphia.

• Western New York Irrigation: this plan will build off the canal’s water infrastructure to expand its irrigation capabilities. The team includes SUNY ESF Professor Stephen Shaw, C&S Companies of Syracuse and the Cornell Cooperative Extension.

• Upstate Archipelago: this team is developing designs for resilient water landscapes that also provide public recreation space and wildlife habitat. The team includes Cornell Design, Ithaca; Cornell Cooperative Extension and H+N+S, a landscape architecture firm based in the Netherlands.

For more information about the competition and to watch videos about each project, visit www.canals.ny.gov/reimaginethecanals.


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Erie Canal photo contest winners named

Posted 2 October 2018 at 10:30 am

Kyle Preston’s photo of “Winter’s Sunset” in Brockport won first place in the Along the Trail category in the annual Erie Canalway Photo Contest. Winning images will be featured in 2019 calendar. The winning shots didn’t include any sites in Orleans County.

Press Release, Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor

WATERFORD – Twelve images that capture the beauty and character of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor have been selected as winners of the 13th Annual Erie Canalway Photo Contest. Winning images will be featured in the 2019 Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor calendar, which will be available for free at libraries and visitor centers beginning in December.

Judges selected first, second and third place photographs in four contest categories from nearly 300 entries. In addition, twelve photographs received an honorable mention. Winning photos may be viewed at www.eriecanalway.org/gallery.

Winning images span the entire length of the canal system from Hudson Falls on the Champlain Canal to Tonawanda at the western gateway to the Erie Canal.

“These outstanding images offer a snapshot of what makes this 500-mile ribbon of waterway connecting the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes a national treasure,” said Bob Radliff, Erie Canalway Executive Director. “We hope they inspire people to protect and celebrate our unparalleled canal heritage.”

The public is invited to pick up a free calendar at libraries and visitor centers beginning in December. Locations will be posted in November at: https://eriecanalway.org/get-involved/photo-contest. Funding support for the calendar comes from the New York State Canal Corporation and the National Park Service.

2019 Erie Canalway Photo Contest Winners

Classic Canal

1st Place, Mirror: Past and Present (Clay) by Suzanne Grosz, Webster, NY

2nd Place, Lyndon Road Footpath (Fairport) by Tracy Lyn Lause, Fairport, NY

3rd Place, Best Friends (Newark) by Mary E. Smith, Newark, NY

Canal Communities

1st Place, Fairport at Dawn (Fairport) by Tom Kredo, Rochester, NY

2nd Place, Sunset View of Tonawanda (Tonawanda) by Pierre Williot, Buffalo, NY

3rd Place, Morning Light (Lockport) by Robert Klick, Amherst, NY

Along the Trail

1st Place, Winter’s Sunset (Brockport) by Kyle Preston, Brockport, NY

2nd Place, Paddling the Waterford Locks (Waterford) by Stefanie Obkirchner, Amsterdam, NY

3rd Place, Richmond Aqueduct (Montezuma) by James Zeger, Sodus, NY

On the Water

1st Place, Westward Bound (Lockport) by Lee Williams, Lockport, NY

2nd Place, Sunset at the Marina (Ilion) by Cliff Oram, Ilion, NY

3rd Place, Misty Sunrise (Northumberland) by Susan Meyer, Schuylerville, NY

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‘Reimagine the Canals’ winners to be announced on Oct. 3

Photo by Tom Rivers: A boat passes along the Erie Canal in Albion on Tuesday.

Staff Reports Posted 20 September 2018 at 9:34 am

ROCHESTER – The caretakers of the Erie Canal will announce the winners of a $2.5 million global competition to transform the canal system for a new generation.

The State Canal Corporation and New York Power Authority, which oversees the canal system, on Oct. 3 will announce the winners of the “Reimagine the Canals” competition. The unveiling will be at the Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester.

There were 145 entries in the competition, which was narrowed to seven finalists in April. The competition sought new approaches for how to both use the canals as an engine for economic development and also to become a hub for tourism and recreation.

Each of the seven finalists received up to $50,000 to further develop their entries for the next stage.

The winners will receive between $250,000 and $1.5 million to plan and implement their projects.

The programs and initiatives are intended to promote the Canal System and its trails as a tourist destination and recreational asset for New York residents and visitors; sustainable economic development along the Canal System; the Canal System’s heritage; and the long-term financial sustainability of the Canal Corporation.

Additionally, the competition sought entries on two separate tracks, one for infrastructure; the other for programs that have the potential to increase recreation use and tourism.

The finalists are:

• Go the Distance: this initiative will look to develop overnight accommodations for recreational users of the canal system. The team includes the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor from Waterford, NY; Gray Slate Partners from Troy, NY; 2K Design from Clifton Park, NY and Dorgan Architecture & Planning from Storrs, Conn.

• Canal Winterlocks: seeks to develop winter-time uses for the Erie Canal, potentially including skating, hockey, winter festivals and cross-country skiing. The team includes Clare Lyster Urbanism and Architecture and John Ronan Architects, both from Chicago and Urban Engineers from Philadelphia.

• Great Erie Canal Race: a multi-day race for many types of watercraft, with a component for bikers and hikers. The team, led by Parks and Trails New York, includes Joe Gustainis from Caledonia, NY and Karthik Namasivayam from Pittsford, NY, as advisors.

• Intra-Works: installations of art and sculpture to forge a cultural identity that links up the Canal System. The team includes the architecture and planning firms Collective Studio from New York City and WRT and Interface, both from Philadelphia.

• Pocket Neighborhoods: a model for canal-side neighborhoods that have the Erie Canal as the core of their identity. The team includes the Madison County Planning Department and Stream Collaborative, an architecture firm in Ithaca.

• Western New York Irrigation: this plan will build off the canal’s water infrastructure to expand its irrigation capabilities. The team includes SUNY ESF Professor Stephen Shaw, C&S Companies of Syracuse and the Cornell Cooperative Extension.

• Upstate Archipelago: this team is developing designs for resilient water landscapes that also provide public recreation space and wildlife habitat. The team includes Cornell Design, Ithaca; Cornell Cooperative Extension and H+N+S, a landscape architecture firm based in the Netherlands.

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Volunteers sought for shoreline cleanup on Saturday

Staff Reports Posted 13 September 2018 at 3:51 pm

The Orleans County Soil & Water Conservation District is seeking volunteers its annual shoreline cleanup this Saturday.

Volunteers will collect and record the litter they pick up at nearby waterways. The volunteers are expected to head to the Widewaters of the Erie Canal near Knowlesville, the boat launch area at Lake Alice and the Dam area on the east side of Lake Alice.

Volunteers will convene at the south pavilion of Bullard Park in Albion at 9 a.m.

Contact the Orleans County Soil and Water Conservation District at 585-589-5959 ext. 5 if you are interested in helping or if you have any questions.

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DEC says fishing in Lake Ontario has been ‘spectacular’

Posted 30 August 2018 at 2:21 pm

Catch rate for salmon is well above average, ‘best fishing in decades’

Press Release, DEC

Photo by Tom Rivers: Gary Bloom of Albion holds a 24-pound, 3-ounce Chinook salmon he caught during the Orleans County Fishing Derby, which ended on Aug. 19.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos today announced that fishing for trout and salmon in Lake Ontario has set records this year, with veteran anglers reporting some of the best fishing in decades.

“The New York waters of Lake Ontario provide a world-famous recreational fishery for trout and salmon, and fishing has been exceptional this summer,” Commissioner Seggos said. “Preliminary results from the Lake Ontario Fishing Boat Survey indicate that fishing for Chinook salmon has been outstanding along the entire New York shoreline.”

Fishing success is measured by “catch rate,” which is the number of fish caught per boat trip. The catch rate for Chinook salmon during April to June 2018 set a record that was 227 percent above the previous five-year average. The catch rate for all trout and salmon species combined also surpassed the previous record high, more than 37 percent above the previous five-year average.

Fishing for brown trout and coho salmon has also been excellent in 2018, with catch rates 38 and 21 percent higher than their respective, previous five-year averages. Atlantic salmon represent a relatively small portion of the Lake Ontario fishery but catch rates for Atlantic salmon were 73 percent above the previous five-year average.

“This is the second year in a row that the take of Chinook has been above average at Oswego, as reported by Council members,” said Chuck Parker, president of the New York State Conservation Council. “There are so many variables that can and do affect the quality of the fishing opportunities we have. We at the NYSCC recognize that the science-based management practices of the DEC’s Bureau of Fisheries are an integral force in sustaining the New York’s world class Lake Ontario fishery.”

Captain Vince Pierleoni of Olcott said, “It’s the best Chinook fishing I’ve seen since 1989.”

Captain Bob Songin of Pt. Breeze said, “The fishing out of Wilson Harbor to the Niagara River has been spectacular, with many Chinook and coho salmon hitting as well as the occasional lake trout mixed in.”

Fishing for Chinook salmon and brown trout has also been great in Eastern Lake Ontario with large numbers of fish caught all along the shoreline. Oswego produced a 28.1-pound Chinook salmon that won the grand prize in the Spring Lake Ontario Counties (LOC) Trout and Salmon Derby.

Lake Ontario is consistently ranked among the top fishing destinations in the country by national publications. Lake Ontario and its embayments and tributaries comprise more than 2.7 million acres and support thriving populations of fish, including a variety of trout, salmon, bass, walleye, yellow perch, and panfish.

A recent statewide angler survey estimated that more than 2.6 million angler days were spent on Lake Ontario and major tributaries. The estimated value of these fisheries exceeded $112 million annually to local economies.

DEC encourages anglers to head out on Lake Ontario and experience some of the best trout and salmon fishing in the U.S. Additional information about fishing Lake Ontario can be found on DEC’s website.

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Public urged to attend meeting on Aug. 30 for waterfront revitalization in 3 Orleans towns

Posted 21 August 2018 at 10:14 am

Press Release, Orleans County Department of Planning and Development

Photo by Tom Rivers: A boater passes through the channel at Oak Orchard Harbor at Point Breeze in this photo from May 28, 2015.

CARLTON – To effectively plan for the Orleans County waterfront, a public forum will be held as part of the process for amending the Local Waterfront Revitalization Program (LWRP). The towns of Kendall, Carlton and Yates, along with the Village of Lyndonville welcome residents, landowners, and other interested parties to attend this event on Aug. 30 to offer their input on recommendations for waterfront improvements.

The public information meeting is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Carlton Fire Company Recreation Hall on 1813 Oak Orchard Road (Route 98). Doors will be opened 30 minutes early at to allow the public time to review maps of existing conditions for the area.

The purpose of the meeting is twofold. It is educational to briefly explain the objectives of an LWRP program, as it has been many years since it was first adopted; it is also about obtaining ideas from the public for improving the Lake Ontario and creek corridor waterfronts.

Having an LWRP enables waterfront communities to evaluate land use and waterfront resources and develop a comprehensive strategy to effectively manage and protect those resources. Planned improvements are the means for getting this done. By applying a local focus on land use management, along with the maintenance, improvement and enhancement of important resources and features in the waterfront area, an LWRP strengthens existing state programming and provides the participating communities with a road map to guide growth and recognize opportunities.

It also provides more local control over decisions made along its waterfront. The goal is to develop an update to the existing local program that properly manages land use and future development along the waterfront, effectively protects important coastal resources and recognizes opportunities for public improvements.

The Orleans County Department of Planning and Development was awarded a state grant for amendment of the LWRP. The county entered into a contract for the provision of professional services with Wendel and WWS Planning in April2017, to assist with the project.

The project team has been working with a community-based steering group – the Waterfront Advisory Committee – to collect and review information on existing waterfront conditions, including land use and community character; economic development; public access and recreation; flooding and erosion; historic preservation; scenic and environmental resources; and water quality. These efforts were supplemented by public comments gathered at an information meeting that was held in April of this year. To complement the information, the Waterfront Advisory Committee is asking local citizens to assist in identifying important issues, opportunities, desires and concerns to help establish a clear vision for the waterfront.

Comments will be accepted electronically for those who cannot attend by clicking here. Comments will also be accepted on the Orleans County Department of Planning and Development’s webpage.

For additional information on these meetings or the LWRP project, contact Ellen Parker, Wendel, (716) 688-0766. You may also contact the Orleans County Department of Planning and Development at (585) 589-3189 (Director Jim Bensley) or (585) 589-3187 (Planner Sarah Gatti).

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Nearly 30-pound salmon wins Orleans County Fishing Derby

Photos by Tom Rivers: Kent Morgan, owner of Let It Ride Charters in Carlton, holds the grand prize fish, a 29-pound, 14-ounce salmon caught by his customer, Joseph Miller of Harrisburg, Pa. The big fish won the $4,000 grand prize.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 19 August 2018 at 8:24 pm

CARLTON – The Orleans County Fishing Derby concluded today after 16 days with a nearly 30-pound salmon taking the top prize, $4,000.

The derby has been an annual event for about 35 years. There were almost 400 participants in the competition, which is sponsored by the Albion Rotary Club.

The grand prize fish – 29 pounds, 14 ounces – was caught by Joseph Miller of Harrisburg, Pa. He was on a charter boat owned by Kent Morgan, who has been a local charter captain for 18 years.

Besides $4,000 for the biggest fish, the four division leaders – salmon, rainbow trout/steelhead, lake trout and brown trout – each get $500, followed by $300 for second, $200 for third, $100 for fourth and $50 for fifth.

Division first -place winners ($500 each)

• Salmon – 26 pounds, 14 ounces by Mike Schaeffer of Silgo, Pa.

• Rainbow/steelhead – 12 pounds, 2 ounces by Glenn Weber of Harrisburg, Pa.

• Brown trout – 14 pounds, 13 ounces by Michael Grager of Lyndonville

• Lake trout – 17 pounds, 12 ounces by Brian Gambell of Hilton

Brian Gambell of Hilton holds the first place lake trout at 17 pounds, 12 ounces.

Michael Grager of Lyndonville holds the first place brown trout at 14 pounds, 13 ounces. Grager is the charter boat captain of “Get Hooked” based at Point Breeze. He noticed the leaderboard didn’t have many brown trout more than midway through he derby so he made a concerted effort to catch them. In the beginning of the derby he thinks most anglers are focused on catching big salmon. He used a spoon in shallow water just east of the Point to catch the first place brown trout.

Dane Ballard, 14, of Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland holds a 26-pound, 3-ounce salmon he caught with his grandfather, Denny Jackson of Ogdensburg, Pa. The fish was the second place salmon in the derby.

The first place winner for steelhead also was on Morgan’s boat, Let It Ride Charters. Kent Morgan holds the fish with his first mate, Jack Rossman. Glenn Weber of Harrisburg, Pa., caught the 12-pound, 2-ounce fish which won first place.

Mike Waterhouse, retired sports fishing promotion coordinator for Orleans County, served as the emcee of the awards program at the Carlton Recreation Hall.

Becky Karls, left, sold raffle tickets and Marlee Diehl, back right, handed out prizes. About 75 people attended the awards program.

Bill Downey, chairman of the derby, also distributed some of the prizes at the awards event. Many local businesses donated for the event.

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Aug. 31 is deadline for Erie Canal photo contest

Posted 9 August 2018 at 9:10 pm

Press Release, Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor

Photo by Tom Rivers: Icicles are pictured hanging inside the Canal Culvert in Ridgeway on Dec. 12, 2017. The Canal Culvert is one of Orleans County’s best-known landmarks.

WATERFORD – Amateur and professional photographers are invited submit images for the 13th annual Erie Canalway Photo Contest. Entries must be postmarked by August 31.

Images should convey the wealth of things to do and see along the waterway and express the unique character of the canal and canal communities. Winning photos will be featured in the 2019 Erie Canalway calendar.

Images will be judged in four contest categories: On the Water, Along the Trail, Canal Communities, and Classic Canal.

Judges will select first, second, and third place winning images in each category, as well as 12 honorable mentions.

Images must be taken within the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor, which spans 524 miles across the full expanse of upstate New York. It encompasses the Erie, Cayuga-Seneca, Oswego, and Champlain canals and their historic alignments, as well as more than 230 canal communities.

Download official contest rules and an entry form by clicking here.

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