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Nominations sought for Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame

Photo by Tom Rivers: Jim Hancock, a member of the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame Committee, speaks during the Oct. 18 Hall of Fame induction ceremony at Medina City Hall, where the Hall of Fame is located in the main meeting room.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 3 June 2019 at 4:15 pm

MEDINA – The Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame is seeking nominations for prominent buildings made of Medina Sandstone that are well-maintained and architecturally significant.

Since the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame was created in 2013, the society has inducted churches, public buildings, private buildings and other ornamental buildings/structures, such as the Civil War Memorial at Mount Albion Cemetery.

The Hall of Fame has inducted 27 structures into the exclusive club. There are plaques for the inductees inside Medina City Hall at the main meeting room.

The Sandstone Society accepts nominations each year. So far, 54 places have been nominated. Don Colquhoun, one of the Hall of Fame Committee members, said many other prominent sites worthy of induction have yet to be nominated.

People can send their choices for induction directly to the Hall of Fame Committee of the Medina Sandstone Society by mailing the nomination to the Medina Sandstone Society, PO Box 25, Medina, N.Y., 14103. Or a nomination may be sent electronically using the online address: www.sandstonesociety.org/hof-nominations.

This year’s class could include nominations from previous years not already selected, and any new nominations received by July 31, Colquhoun said.

He is on the Hall of Fame Committee with Dave Miller and Jim Hancock. They will research all nominations and make a site visit. Criteria for consideration shall include age, beauty, longevity, structural soundness, and architectural uniqueness. If possible nomination information should have full background and documentation, and, at the very least, should give a name and phone number to be contacted for further information or a website.

St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Batavia is one of many churches in Western New York and beyond made of Medina Sandstone. Batavia is home to one Hall of Fame structure: the Richmond Memorial Library.

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‘Great community effort’ brings bronze statue home

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 17 April 2019 at 11:05 pm

Photos by Tom Rivers

MEDINA – The bronze statue of a soldier, resembling a doughboy from pre-World War II, was mounted atop a monument today in front of the Orleans County YMCA. Cody Dix of the Medina DPW is at right.

That building has been a Y for more than three decades. But for 76 years it was the Medina Armory, a site used to train soldiers for battle.

The new statue looks to be right at home by the former Armory.

The statue is taken out of the YMCA, where it spent the winter inside. The statue was finished in November and made its public debut in the Parade of Lights on Nov. 24.

The Armory opened in 1901. In 1977, it was closed by the National Guard.

Bill Menz trained at the building in 1953, when he joined Company C of the 174th Armored Infantry. He was promoted to corporal before transferring to active duty in 1956 to the US Army National Guard. He would come back to Medina and work about 40 years in construction as a plasterer/mason.

The Menz family is pictured with the statue and monument after the installation today. Pictured include Menz’s wife Betty, second from left, and their four children, from left: Timothy Menz, Mary Beth Germano, granddaughter Alyssa Germano, Lynne Menz (in back) and Tam Menz.

When the Armory closed, Bill Menz was on the committee that helped it find a new use as a YMCA. Menz, who died at age 86 on July 16 last year, wanted the community to know the building’s historical role in preparing soldiers to fight on behalf of the country. He teamed with his friend John Fuller to create a sandstone monument in front of the Y that listed 550 soldiers who trained at the Armory and were then deployed in wars. Menz and Fuller cut the stone and built the monument.

But it wasn’t done. Menz wanted a bronze statue of a soldier on top. He pushed for nearly a decade to raise the $65,000 for the statue. He was able to see it in pieces at the foundry before his death. His daughter, Lynne Menz, included some of her father’s ashes underneath the statue’s base, just before it was mounted today.

Mary Beth Germano, center, is one of Menz’s four children. She takes a photo of the statue being moved out of the former Armory, down Pearl Street and to the front lawn of the building.

Germano thanked the local residents and many veterans’ organizations for supporting the project with donations.

“It’s emotional seeing it,” she said after the installation this morning. “It’s a great community effort.”

Her father was unwavering in pushing the project in the community.

“When he had his mind set on something, it was full-speed ahead,” Germano said.

Ben Lacy, right, of the Medina DPW was off from work today but wanted to help with the statue installation. Lacy grew up next door to Menz. Lacy said he admired Menz’s determination in working on the monument and memorial for the local soldiers.

“Bill was dedicated to get this done and I wanted to help today to get this up and done,” Lacy said.

The statue was created by sculptor Brian Porter and the University of Buffalo’s foundry director Chris Serano.

Mayor Michael Sidari was among the onlookers watching the statue installation today. He said the statue is great addition to Medina.

“It’s a great tribute to the members that served our country out of the Armory,” Sidari said. “Many came back and many did not. Those that did continued to serve their community.”

Medina next month will also welcome the return of a World War I cannon. It had been a fixture at State Street Park for about 80 years. It has been gone since March 2018 while the cannon has been refurbished in Altoona, Pa. at Seed Artillery Reproduction and Restoration. It is coming back to Medina on May 1 and will be rededicated on Memorial Day.

The statue is expected to be formally dedicated during a ceremony in September. That will give time for landscaping work and some changes to be made to the plaques on the monument. Some lights may also be added to the site.

For more on the statue and monument, click here.

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Sandstone Society leading tour of acclaimed Buffalo sites

By Ginny Kropf, correspondent Posted 10 April 2019 at 1:27 pm

Photos by Tom Rivers: The top of St. Louis Catholic Church in Buffalo is an open work lattice spire that reaches 245 feet high. It is the tallest open-work spire ever built completely of stone in the United States, and it is also believed to be the only remaining open-work or pierced spire in the U.S.

MEDINA – The 2019 Medina Sandstone Society’s bus tour is headed to Buffalo to see some of the city’s landmark structures that are made of local sandstone.

The Sandstone Tourism Committee – consisting of chair Sue Holland, Gabrielle Barone, Peggy Schreck and Rob Klino – have put together an exciting day on May 8, which will include several structures previously inducted into the Sandstone Hall of Fame and lunch at the historic Hotel Henry’s 100 Acres Restaurant.

The first tour sponsored by the Medina Sandstone Society took place in 2008 and was an idea of the late Bob Waters, who came up with the idea of a walking tour of Medina’s Main Street. Forty-five people took part in the tour, led by then County Historian Bill Lattin.

The next year, Lattin led another tour of Medina’s downtown, ending at the Medina Historical Society, in which 61 participated.

The year 2010 saw 68 people take part in the tour of three Medina churches – St. Mary’s, First Baptist and St. John’s, each made of different colors of Medina sandstone.

In 2011, Lattin included Todd Bensley of the Medina Historical Society in a canal walk to Medina Falls, in which 60 people participated.

The following year, 71 people signed up for a tour of Boxwood Cemetery, led by Lattin and Bensley.

After a tour of Main Street which focused on the newly installed historical panels, the Sandstone Society took a four-year break.

St. Paul’s Cathedral was built by the Episcopal Church from 1849-1851. The church used stone from a quarry in Hulberton. This church was Buffalo’s first major architectural landmark. It was designed by Richard Upjohn after he earned a national reputation for his design of the Trinity Episcopal Church in New York City.

Last year, Holland came up with the idea of an Orleans County Hall of Fame bus tour, which Lattin agreed to narrate. It included sites in Orleans County that are in the Medina sandstone Hall of Fame. In Medina the stops included Holy Trinity Parish (St. Mary’s Catholic Church), the former Armory (now the Orleans County YMCA) and then St. John’s Episcopal Church. The tour went to Albion and included the Pullman Memorial Universalist Church, First Presbyterian Church and Mount Albion Cemetery. The group then went to Holley to see St. Mary’s Catholic Church and Hillside Cemetery, where the chapel has the only flying buttress in the county.

“That was so successful, we decided to branch out,” Holland said.

For the first time, this year’s tour will take participants on a bus tour to Buffalo , to view and tour interiors of historic Medina sandstone structures.

After gathering at 8:30 a.m. at Medina City Hall and viewing the Sandstone Hall of Fame on the second floor, the bus will depart for Buffalo .

One of the most anticipated stops will be the Hotel Henry, an elegant hotel in the Richardson Olmsted Complex. Construction on the 147-year-old Richardson Olmsted Campus began in 1872 and opened in 1880 as the state-of-the-art Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane.

It closed a century later, to reopen after a $100 million renovation as the new Hotel Henry. The hotel is named after its designer, Henry Hobson Richardson, who worked alongside landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, who also laid out nearby Delaware Park .

After the Richardson Complex fell into disrepair, a group of local preservationists in the early 2000s sued the state, forcing them to fix it up. The extensive renovation took 15 years and millions of taxpayer dollars.

The Hotel Henry has become one of Buffalo’s premier destinations for weddings and special occasions. The second floor houses the 100 Acres Restaurant, which was named for the 100 acres set aside for patient farmland when the hospital first opened. Eighty-eight guestrooms and suites are located in the two buildings flanking the towers.

Photo by Ginny Kropf: Sue Holland, a director with the Medina Sandstone Society and chair of the Tourism Committee, stands before the Sandstone Wall of Fame in Medina ’s City Hall. On May 8, the Medina Sandstone Society will sponsor a day-long bus tour to several sandstone structures in Buffalo, including lunch at the historic Hotel Henry at the Richardson Olmsted Complex, which is in the Medina Sandstone Society’s Hall of Fame.

The bus will drive by Lafayette Lofts, a luxurious residential complex created by the Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian Church; Buffalo Connecticut Street Armory; First Presbyterian Church, across from Kleinhans Music Hall; and Ashbury Hall/Babeville. All have been inducted into the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame.

Participants will disembark and tour St. Louis Church and St. Paul’s Cathedral, both of which are also in the Sandstone Hall of Fame.

On the bus ride to Buffalo, two videos by Channel 2 will be shown – the first when Bob Waters and Todd Bensley were interviewed and the second where Lattin discussed the origin of sandstone quarries.

“The chance to see these videos is a real plus,” Holland said.

Holland also said the Sandstone Society is having booklets made of all the sites, and these will be given to riders.

“They will definitely get their money’s worth,” she said.

Anyone wishing more information may contact Holland at shollan2@rochester.rr.com, by calling (585) 721-3809 or by clicking here for the Sandstone Society website.

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Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame adds 3 more sites

Photos by Tom Rivers: Three buildings were inducted into the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame on Thursday. Representing the James Prendergast Free Library in Jamestown includes Tina Scott, library director, and Ned Lindstrom, a member of the library’s board of trustees; Representing St. John’s Episcopal Church in Clifton Springs is Andrew VanBuren, the church's rector; Representing Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian Church/Lafayette Lofts in Buffalo are Paul Meyer, a member of the Session, and Diane Poleon, a member of the church.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 19 October 2018 at 7:35 am

Buildings inducted from Jamestown, Buffalo and Clifton Springs

MEDINA – Three buildings that were built in the late 1800s from local Medina Sandstone were inducted Thursday afternoon into the Medina Sandstone Society’s Hall of Fame.

The new inductees include the Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian Church/Lafayette Lofts in Buffalo, St. John’s Episcopal Church in Clifton Springs and the James Prendergast Free Library in Jamestown.

The Medina Sandstone Society started the Hall of Fame in 2013 and has now inducted 27 structures into the exclusive club. There are plaques for the inductees inside City Hall at the main meeting room.

The Sandstone Society accepts nominations each year. So far, 54 places have been nominated. Don Colquhoun, one of the Hall of Fame Committee members, said many other prominent sites worthy of induction have yet to be nominated.

Colquhoun and Jim Hancock, president of the Sandstone Society and chairman of the HOF Committee, said there will be new inductees for many years to come.

“We’re not even close,” Colquhoun said about honoring all of the awesome Medina Sandstone sites.

The Sandstone Society wants to recognize well-maintained buildings and other sandstone sites that are unique and architecturally significant. The society has inducted churches, public buildings, private buildings and ornamental buildings/structures.

“We have truly been amazed at the multitude of buildings from this seemingly indestructible building material,” Hancock said.

The new inductees include:

• Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian Church/Lafayette Lofts in Buffalo

Paul Meyer, left, is a member of the Session at Lafayette. He listens to the citation from Don Colquhoun about the church and its loft apartments.

The Lafayette Presbyterian Church had the building constructed at the corner of Lafayette and Elmwood avenues in 1894.

The church is a sterling example of the use of Medina Sandstone in the Romanesque Revival style with a large cruciform floor plan and an attached rear chapel. Lafayette was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2009.

More recently, the rear of this historic church building was repurposed into the Lafayette Lofts, offering a number of modern living spaces, culinary center, the office and meeting spaces without compromising the original architectural design and beauty.

“It is a great example of historic preservation at its best,” said Don Colquhoun, a member of the Hall of Fame Committee.

 

• St. John’s Episcopal Church in Clifton Springs

Andrew VanBuren, rector at St. John’s, said the congregation takes great pride in the church building.

Construction of this church on Main Street in this Ontario County village was completed in 1883, after the cornerstone was laid in 1879.

The church’s Belgian Gothic style makes this edifice remarkably unique. The Medina sandstone was brought by barge from Medina along the Erie Canal to Port Gibson and transported by wagon or sleds to the build site.

“If you visit Clifton Springs and drive down Main Street, heading east and look up, you’ll see this beautiful Medina Sandstone church silhouetted on the horizon, welcoming you to this historic village,” Hancock said.

Andrew VanBuren, the rector at St. John’s the past 3 ½ years, said the church of 35-40 attendees faced a $50,000 project to repoint stones. The congregation raised the funds and is determined to not let the building fall into disrepair.

“It’s important for us to have a structure that welcomes people,” he said.

He praised the generations before him that have worked so hard with the building.

• James Prendergast Free Library, Jamestown

The Prendergast family donated the money to build a library in Jamestown in memory of James Prendergast, son of this Chautauqua County city’s founder. Architect A.J. Warner of Rochester was given $65,000 to design and build a 127-foot by 100-foot structure that was completed in 1891 after 11 years of effort.

Tina Scott, Prendergast library director, accepts the award.

This sturdy-looking building was built of rock-faced Medina sandstone in the Richardsonian Romanesque style.

The use of contrasting gray and red sandstone, curved arches over the entrance and a lovely turret on the southeast corner give the library a uniquely enchanting appearance.

In the 1960s, an expansion and modernization project added 16,500 square feet to the library, but the Medina Sandstone south side entrance and interior rooms remained largely unchanged and still retain all the charm that the Prendergast family would have appreciated.

Tina Scott, Prendergast library director the past 10 years, said the sandstone building is so sound it was once used as a bomb shelter. She loves the marble floors inside and the alternating sandstone colors, the red and gray.

The building is a source of pride in the Jamestown community, she said.

“It was built to last,” she said. “You don’t see them built like that these days.”

Scott said she didn’t known there has a Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame until recently when she was notified the Jamestown library would be inducted. She praised the organizers for their local pride and for recognizing the outstanding sites.

“It’s awesome because you’re keeping the history of your town alive,” she said.

Jim Hancock, president of the Medina Sandstone Society, gives the welcome message during the Hall of Fame program. He stands in front of a revamped display of all the inductees since 2013.

Takeform Architectural Graphics in Medina has donated all of the plaques in the Hall of Fame. The local company also did a redesign of the display, which was running out of room for new inductees. The new display has room for another four or five years, Hancock said.

Bill Hungerford, president of Takeform, has been a Sandstone Society supporter and member since the group started in 2004.

For more on the Hall of Fame, click here.


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New class of Medina Sandstone buildings will be inducted into Hall of Fame Oct. 18

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 24 September 2018 at 9:32 am

Photo by Tom Rivers: The Pullman Memorial Universalist Church is pictured recently in Albion. The church was inducted into the first class of the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame in 2013.

MEDINA – A new class of magnificent Medina Sandstone buildings will be inducted into the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame on Oct. 18.

This will be the sixth class to go into the Hall of Fame, which is located inside City Hall in Medina. The Medina Sandstone Society is planning an induction ceremony from 1 to 3 p.m. on Oct. 18.

The new class includes three inductees.

Since the Hall of Fame was established in 2013, 24 buildings have been enshrined in the Hall of Fame with sites across New York State and one in Erie, Pennsylvania.

The Hall of Fame Committee – Jim Hancock, David Miller and Don Colquhoun – makes road trips to all of the nominees and does research on the buildings. Hancock, the Sandstone Society president, said he has developed a far deeper appreciation for the local quarried stone.

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Sandstone Society has sellout for first local bus tour

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 30 April 2018 at 11:06 am

Photos by Tom Rivers

ALBION – Michael Miano of Middleport takes a photo of the First Presbyterian Church of Albion on Sunday as part of the first bus tour of local sites that are in the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame.

The Medina Sandstone Society organized the tour and had a sell-out with 30 people riding the bus through My Cowboy Transportation in Medina.

The Sandstone Society established the Hall of Fame in 2013. There are plaques of the inductees hanging inside the main meeting room at City Hall in Medina.

The group heads into Pullman Memorial Universalist Church in Albion which was included in the debut Hall of Fame Class in 2013.

The tour started in Medina and included Holy Trinity Parish (St. Mary’s Catholic Church), the former Armory (now the Orleans County YMCA) and then St. John’s Episcopal Church.

The bus then headed to Albion for stops at the Pullman Memorial Universalist Church, First Presbyterian Church and Mount Albion Cemetery. The group then went to Holley to see St. Mary’s Catholic Church and Hillside Cemetery, where the chapel has the only flying buttress in the county.

Bill Lattin, the retired Orleans County historian, welcomes the group into the Pullman Memorial Universalist Church. Lattin described architectural features and the local efforts behind creating the landmark buildings.

The Pullman church was built in a Gothic Revival style to resemble an 11th century rural England church. George Pullman, the famed railroad industrialist, provided about $67,000 to build the church in Albion in honor of his parents. The church opened in January 1895 after some anxiety in waiting for the large Tiffany stained glass window of Christ the Consoler.

The church has always been electrified, with power coming from the hydroelectric dam in Waterport, Lattin said.

Dave Miller of the Sandstone Society welcomed nominations for the 2018 Hall of Fame Class. For more information, click here.

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Medina Sandstone Society seeks nominations for Hall of Fame

Photo by Tom Rivers: St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Batavia is one of many churches in the region built of Medina sandstone. Last year, the Medina Sandstone Society inducted the Richmond Memorial Library in Batavia into the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame, the first building from Batavia to be enshrined.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 6 April 2018 at 1:29 pm

MEDINA – The Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame, started in 2013, will be inducting its 2018 class this coming October. Nominations for induction are now being sought.

People from anywhere can send their choices for induction directly to the Hall of Fame Committee of the Medina Sandstone Society by mailing the nomination to the Medina Sandstone Society, PO Box 25, Medina, N.Y., 14103. Or a nomination may be sent electronically by filling out the online form (click here).

The Hall of Fame Committee will consider nominations from previous years not already selected, and any new nominations received by July 31.

The home of the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame has been established in Medina’s City Hall, a structure itself made of the same brownstone quarried in the Medina area for over 100 years. The initial Hall of Fame class included 6 structures located in and around Western New York. The 2017 class included 4 more structures including buildings from Jamestown, Rochester, Albion and Batavia.

Hall of Fame Committee members Jim Hancock (chairman), Dave Miller and Don Colquhoun will research all nominations and make a site visit. Criteria for consideration shall include age, beauty, longevity, structural soundness and architectural uniqueness.

If possible nomination information should have full background and documentation, and, at the very least, should give a name and phone number to be contacted for further information or a website.

Four new inductees were added to the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame on Oct. 19, 2017, including First Presbyterian Church in Albion, Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Rochester, Richmond Memorial Library in Batavia, and First Lutheran Church of Jamestown. Pictured in front from left: Cathy Vail, CFO for Holy Sepulchre; Lynn Sullivan, CEO of Holy Sepulcre; Tim McGee, elder at First Presbyterian Church in Albion; and Twyla Boyer, First Presbyterian’s pastor. Back row: Brenda Gagliano, Holy Sepulchre’s records coordinator; Dan Nagle, pastor of First Lutheran Church in Jamestown; Jim Jacobs, facilities director for Batavia City School District which owns and maintains Richmond Memorial Library in Batavia; Rob Conrad, director of Richmond Memorial; and Chris Dailey, superintendent of Batavia City School District.

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Medina Sandstone Society will offer first bus tour

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 3 April 2018 at 3:18 pm

Will stop at sites that are in Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame

Photo by Tom Rivers: The blossoms were in bloom by the front entrance of Mount Albion Cemetery in this photo from May 10, 2015. The front arch is made of Medina sandstone, one of many sandstone features in the historic cemetery.

The Medina Sandstone Society has sponsored many historic walking tours in Medina in recent years. The organization is planning another tour on April 29, but for the first time the Sandstone Society will take a bus to visit numerous sites.

The bus tour will highlights buildings and sites that are all in the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame. Bill Lattin, the retired Orleans County historian, will serve as tour guide.

The group will go inside some of the buildings on the tour. Some spots will just be a quick visit without going inside.

“This is something new we’re trying,” said Jim Hancock, president of the Sandstone Society.  “We have hosted walking tours around historic downtown Medina in the past, but this time we’re renting a tour bus and having a guided tour around Orleans County of beautiful sandstone structures which, incidentally, are inducted into our famous Hall of Fame.”

Lattin will point on the different architectural styles with the buildings, and show some of the different colors and sizes in the sandstone.

The tour starts at 1 p.m. on April 29 at Holy Trinity Parish (St. Mary’s Catholic Church) and West Avenue and then goes to the former Armory (now the Orleans County YMCA) on Pearl Street and then St. John’s Episcopal Church on East Center Street.

The bus then heads to Albion to see the Pullman Memorial Universalist Church, First Presbyterian Church and Mount Albion Cemetery. The group then heads to Holley and St. Mary’s Catholic Church and Hillside Cemetery, where the chapel has the only flying buttress in the county.

The group is scheduled to be back in Medina at 5:30 p.m.

The Sandstone Society is charging $15 for members (stonecutters) and $20 for the general public to go on the tour.

Seating is limited and registration is required. A reservation and check payable to Medina Sandstone Society, can be sent to PO Box 25, Medina, NY 14103. For additional information, send an email to Sue Holland (shollan2@rochester.rr.com).

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4 sites inducted into Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 19 October 2017 at 6:10 pm

Presbyterian Church in Albion, Batavia library, Rochester cemetery and Jamestown church join exclusive club

Photo by Tom Rivers: Four new inductees were added to the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame this afternoon, including First Presbyterian Church in Albion, Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Rochester, Richmond Memorial Library in Batavia, and First Lutheran Church of Jamestown. Pictured in front from left: Cathy Vail, CFO for Holy Sepulchre; Lynn Sullivan, CEO of Holy Sepulcre; Tim McGee, elder at First Presbyterian Church in Albion; and Twyla Boyer, First Presbyterian’s pastor. Back row: Brenda Gagliano, Holy Sepulchre’s records coordinator; Dan Nagle, pastor of First Lutheran Church in Jamestown; Jim Jacobs, facilities director for Batavia City School District which owns and maintains Richmond Memorial Library in Batavia; Rob Conrad, director of Richmond Memorial; and Chris Dailey, superintendent of Batavia City School District.

MEDINA – The Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame inducted four new members into the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame, bringing the number of inductees in the HOF to 24 since the first class was inducted in 2013.

The new inductees include the First Presbyterian Church in Albion, Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Rochester, Richmond Memorial Library in Batavia, and First Lutheran Church of Jamestown.

The Presbyterian Church is the ninth site from Orleans County in the Hall of Fame. Genesee has its first entry with the library in Batavia. Jamestown and Chautauqua County are also making their debut in the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame with the First Lutheran Church. Holy Sepulchre is second site from Rochester to join the HOF.

The Hall of Fame Committee – Jim Hancock, David Miller and Don Colquhoun – make road trips to all of the nominees and do research on the buildings. Hancock, the Sandstone Society president, said he has developed a far deeper appreciation for the local quarried stone.

“We have been truly amazed over the years of the multitude of buildings that are still standing from a seemingly indestructible building material,” Hancock.

The Hall of Fame inductees all deserve praise for maintaining what are often cavernous structures, Hancock said. All of the inductees today shared stories of recent costly renovations, from mortar repointings to new slate roofs.

The following were inducted in the Class of 2016, with the descriptions courtesy of Medina Sandstone Society:

• First Presbyterian Church of Albion

Jim Hancock, right, reads the plaque about the First Presbyterian Church in Albion, which was represented by elder Tim McGee and pastor Twyla Boyer.

The First Presbyterian Church is a beautiful example of rose colored Medina Sandstone. The church commissioned famed architect Andrew Jackson Warner from Rochester to come up with a design for the new church.

It is rumored that the building committee told the architect they wanted a building like his First Presbyterian Church he built in 1871 in Rochester, but with a steeple taller than the Albion Baptist Church. The steeple was to be 175 feet, taller by 15 feet. Construction began in 1874 and completed and dedicated in 1875 and for over 140 years the bells in the majestic bell tower have been calling worshipers to service every Sunday.

***

Boyer spoke during the Hall of Fame induction at Medina City Hall, where the plaques are on display. She said the Albion congregation has been a dedicated steward of the building.

“It is a beautiful church,” she said. “It is a pleasure to be there.”

McGee said the congregation has tackled a recent major interior renovation and last year had to fix the slate roof.

“We continue to make progress preserving the church,” he said. “It’s just beautiful inside.”

• Richmond Memorial Library in Batavia

Rob Conrad, the library director, praised the Batavia City School District for its ongoing maintenance of the historic site.

The Richmond Memorial Library is a beautiful example of light gray Medina Sandstone and red Albion stone. The style is Richardsonian Romanesque and was designed by Rochester architect James Cutler. The Richmond Library employs the style of two-tone sandstone in a random ashlar pattern with a battered foundation and a steep gable roof.

Mrs. Mary Richmond donated a piece of land at the rear of the family property and construction of a library began on July 11, 1887 and was dedicated on March 12, 1889. Mrs. Richmond donated $24,000 towards the cost and insisted on using local labor to build this magnificent building.

The library was named after her son Dean Richmond, Jr., who died in his youth. Mrs. Richmond, noted for her charity, then donated the library to the Union Free School District. The Richmond Library is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and was registered on July 24, 1974.

***

Rob Conrad, library director, said he and the staff are thrilled to see the library go into the Hall of Fame. He praised the Batavia City School District for its ongoing commitment to maintain the site. Conrad said he is impressed by the communities that rallied their dollars to build such impressive buildings in the region, using Medina Sandstone.

“You see the beauty of the buildings and their ingenuity,” he said.

• Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Rochester

Lynn Sullivan, CEO of Holy Sepulchre, accepts the award for cemetery.

All Souls’ Chapel, designed by noted architect Andrew Jackson Warner, was built in 1876, and has become the centerpiece of the Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Rochester, N.Y. The small but graceful building features a steep slate roof, supporting hammer beams, and exquisitely designed stained glass windows featuring the 14 stations of the Cross made in Roermond, Holland.

A companion 100-foot bell tower built in 1886 houses a six crypt mausoleum, the final resting place for the Bishops of the diocese including Bishop Bernard McQuaid, the founder of the cemetery. The Chapel as well as the two gate houses and 1.36-mile stone wall surrounding the cemetery are all made of beautifully preserved and restored red Medina Sandstone.

***

Holy Sepulchre is “synonymous with Medina Sandstone,” said Lynn Sullivan, the cemetery’s chief executive officer. The cemetery is committed to keeping up the historic chapel and bell tower.

“We love Medina Sandstone,” she said. “It’s what the cemetery is known for.”

• First Lutheran Church in Jamestown

The Rev. Dan Nagle is proud of the church in Jamestown, which has 1,100 seats and spectacular stained-glass windows.

First Lutheran congregation was organized by Swedish immigrants in 1856. The construction of their present beautiful cathedral made entirely of red Medina sandstone was started in 1892 and completed in 1901.

It is a magnificent structure and includes a 153-foot-tall bell tower which still functions today. The congregation takes great pride in maintaining the beauty of the church which dominates the city’s skyline.

Many internal and external improvements and restorations have occurred over the years. The interior includes a historic 1901 Hook and Hastings pipe organ rebuilt in 1955, two tiered seating, and numerous beautifully detailed stained glass windows.

***

The Swedish immigrants who founded the church mortgaged their homes ensure the construction would move forward at the church, the Rev. Dan Nagle said.

He leads the church today and remains humbled by the sacrifice and vision of the congregation in the 1890s.

For more on the Medina Sandstone Hall of Fame, click here. (The plaques were are made and donated by Takeform Architectural Graphics in Medina.)

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Sandstone Trust has grants available for community projects in Medina area

Staff Reports Posted 12 October 2017 at 11:44 am

MEDINA – The Medina Sandstone Trust is making several thousand dollars available in grants to community organizations and projects.

The grants generally range from $200 to $500 and are awarded to qualifying not-for-profit organizations and/or programs in the Medina, Ridgeway and Shelby region.

Funding is intended to help programs that clearly benefit this community and that have favorable tax and regulatory status.

The community endowment has given out more than $25,000 over the past seven years. Some projects benefitted since 2011 include improvements to the veterans’ plot at Boxwood Cemetery, downtown Christmas lighting, Lee-Whedon Memorial Library, Medina Historical Society, Medina Business Association, The Arc of Genesee Orleans, YMCA, Orleans Renaissance Group, CAC pre-school, school-parent activities, downtown clock project, Medina Tourism Program, Parade of Lights, Cornell Cooperative Extension, Family Literacy, Millville Cemetery Association and other groups.

To apply for a grant, organization leaders need to fill out a Sandstone Trust Application form and mail to Sandstone Trust, Post Office Box 25, Medina, by the application deadline, Nov. 17.

Application forms can be obtained as follows: In person at Medina Parts Co. (NAPA) 345 N. Main St. or Michael Zelazny, CPA 511 Main St.; By regular mail request sent to Sandstone Trust, PO Box 25, Medina, NY 14103; or online from the Sandstone Trust web page, www.sandstonesociety.org.

Questions may be sent by email at sandstonesociety@gmail.com or calling Michael Zelazny, CPA at 585-798-1006.

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