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letters to the editor

Western New Yorkers pay for Cuomo initiatives that have little local benefit

Posted 15 October 2017 at 9:04 am

Editor:

This is an open letter to Andrew Cuomo. Mr. Cuomo, I live in western NY, live paycheck to paycheck, do not travel to NYC, and can’t afford to own a boat.

Yet every time I travel the Thruway for business or pleasure, I am required to not just pay for the upkeep of this important artery, but also underwrite a downstate bridge named after your father, and a waterway I cannot afford to use.

Why is that?

You’ve stated that the canal system is an important “economic engine” for western NY. How so sir? Certainly, there are some bars and restaurants along the canal that benefit from it being open. At the cost of the great majority of us that neither use or benefit from the huge outlay of tax dollars used to keep it open.

Conservative capitalist as I am, I cannot fathom the rationale of those that use it and/or benefit from it are not responsible for it. But my taxes/tolls are.

I’m well aware I will not receive a response as you ignore the wishes of anyone west of Albany.

This letter is more directed to my fellow western New Yorkers that should and will vote for a NY Constitutional amendment that may restore our state to being a powerhouse of growth.

New laws, including ethics reform, term limits, the repeal of your imposed “safe act” are just the start.

And most importantly demolishing and reinventing tax laws in this state. Why is it you grant huge tax breaks to certain businesses instead of truly making NY “Open for Business.”

Bob Harker

Clarendon

‘Progressive leadership’ leads to bloated state budget

Posted 15 October 2017 at 8:58 am

Editor:

The New York State, County and Local governments rather than complain about elimination of SALT deductions should focus on tax relief. The impact of removing the deduction would be less burdensome to the taxpayer.

Why is this State’s budget double that of Florida? Wasteful spending promoting green energy is just one of the issues which contribute to a bloated budget. The Riverbend Project in Buffalo, built with state dollars and leased for $2 annually to a now defunct owner, should raise attention.

I am certain many more examples exist throughout this state.  Why should Federal taxpayers subsidize the price of progressive leadership?

Ed Urbanik

Lyndonville

Ettinger for county judge is a chance for fresh start in Orleans

Posted 13 October 2017 at 10:25 pm

Editor:

We at the Conservative Party Committee are thrilled to offer our endorsement to such an exquisite candidate and to give the voters of all political affiliations a choice in the race for Orleans County Court Judge, Tonia Ettinger.

She was born and raised in Orleans County. A home town girl.  A Medina High School graduate. Holds an undergraduate degree from SUNY Geneseo. A law degree from University at Buffalo School of Law. She was a former Vice President and later the President of the Orleans County Bar Association.

Tonia has been practicing law for over a decade. Tonia has spent 8 years at The Legal Aid Society protecting the most vulnerable population – our children. Her support and encouragement have helped many overcome life’s obstacles. Tonia has the experience and dedication. Completely qualified with the correct temperament to serve as Judge in all formats. Tonia is honest, ethical and driven. Clearly the best choice to begin a new era. A fresh start. A cleansing for Orleans County.

A few years back the establishment in Orleans County had a hand-picked candidate for Sheriff to continue on with the status quo. One thing they didn’t count on was that the people had had enough of that. The people elected Sheriff Randy Bower. The taxpayers, our great Sheriff’s Department and the employees who work there are better off for it. Our entire County is better off for it. Now with the Honorable Judge Punch vacating his seat the establishment has once again hand-picked who they want to continue the status quo. I have to ask the voting public. Are you happy with the way Orleans County has been run for all the decades?

We at the Conservative committee are offering you a choice like we did in the Sheriff’s election. We know most Republican voters consider themselves conservative. That is why we respectfully ask for you to cast your vote for Tonia Ettinger on the Conservative line at the ballot box on November 7th. We ask all voters from all political affiliations to come out in record numbers. This is for the Orleans County Court Judge. A 10 year term. It matters who holds that seat.

If you would like to know more about Tonia Ettinger and all the Conservative-endorsed candidates, there will be a meet and greet on Sunday, October 22,  and Sunday, November 5, from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Hoag Library in Albion.

Tonia and the rest of the candidates will be there to answer your questions. Educate yourself. Ask questions. Know who you are voting for. The people you elect at the local level have the most effect on your life and your wallet.

Sincerely,

Paul Lauricella Jr.

Lyndonville

Orleans County Conservative Committee

A vote for Capurso is a chance to hold county government more accountable

Posted 12 October 2017 at 11:12 am

Editor:

It is increasingly rare that Orleans voters get an opportunity to hold incumbent County Legislators accountable.  Every voter in the County has such an opportunity this year as Al Capurso is challenging an incumbent golden boy.  That’s right; one out of seven has an opponent this November 7th.

Capurso’s opponent was all in on the sale of the County Nursing Home. Please indulge the sarcasm, but perhaps he didn’t realize that some of its residents are veterans. On top of everything else, selling it effectively raised legislator salaries by 40% as a consequence of a greatly reduced work load.

As I recall, Capurso’s opponent voted to give the District Attorney a new title (Manager of Public Safety) in 2010, along with a $10,000 pay raise. Six months into the job, the Sheriff and Undersheriff told me they didn’t even know the position existed!

Capurso’s opponent once voted to disapprove of proposed State legislation which would have increased the penalties for criminals injuring a law enforcement officer with a firearm during the commission of a crime. Did you have to re-read that one?  It might have helped had he read the proposed State law before voting to disapprove of it.

I believe—though I could be mistaken—that Capurso’s opponent voted to approve rifle hunting of deer in Orleans County during his current term. This issue is not the “no-brainer” a determined few would have you believe. Approximately 90% of the sportspersons I know oppose it!  It will further remove Orleans hunters from—and gradually reduce their familiarity with—the habitat necessary to support the resource they justifiably value. My guess is that Al understands the subtleties of the issue better than many, but I could be wrong.

But it really doesn’t matter what the public thinks, does it?

It appears some would handle the stone quarrying issue in Shelby by talking it to death. It really isn’t that complicated. The fact is that we are privileged to have a National Wildlife Refuge in a County with enormous environmental assets that we should take pains not to jeopardize. The President of the North American Bluebird Society told me in September that the only place he had ever seen a gallinule was in Costa Rica! He was dumbfounded when I told him I picked one up a half mile north of Route 31 last spring. Where does Al’s opponent stand on Frontier Stone’s proposed operation?

Oh, that’s right; he doesn’t have to say because he has an R beside his name.

Not for nothing, but Orleans County needs more Al Capursos, Paul Lauricellas, Joe Sidonios and Emil Smiths (may he rest in peace) to dare say what needs to be said.

Sincerely yours,

Gary Kent

Albion

Tara White has skills to serve Ridgeway well as Town Clerk

Posted 12 October 2017 at 7:41 am

Editor:

We are writing this letter in support of the candidacy of Tara L. White for Ridgeway Town Clerk.

Tara possesses the intelligence and people skills to be an excellent Town Clerk. She has had vast supervisory and administrative experience in the health-care field. In addition, she has an outgoing personality that would stand her in good stead in dealing with members of the public, which is an essential element of that position.

She is a life-long resident of the Medina area and is the mother of young twins, probably the most difficult job there is.

We know that she will make a fine public servant and ask that you cast your vote for her on election day.

Very sincerely,

Lance and Patty Mark

Medina

Retired county judge says Sandy Church has experience, integrity to do daunting job

Posted 11 October 2017 at 7:45 am

Editor:

I wholeheartedly recommend Sanford Church as my successor as Orleans County Judge.

The County Judge in Orleans must be familiar with Family, Civil, and Criminal law. A lack of experience in any of these areas can result in reversals on appeal, which are costly and heartbreaking for victims of crimes and litigants who thought their case was over, only to find they may have to start again from the beginning.

Our judge has to understand and protect the constitutional rights of all, including the rights of law abiding citizens. He must protect abused and neglected children, resolve custody disputes, will contests, civil lawsuits, pistol permits issues – the list goes on. A judge who lacks the expertise to carry out these functions can have a detrimental effect on our way of life.

Sandy’s experience in all these areas of law is extensive and substantial. He has both prosecuted and defended hundreds of serious criminal cases. He has handled thousands of Family Court cases, often representing the interests of neglected and abused children. He has handled serious civil lawsuits, will contests, and just about any other legal matter that could arise here. I know of no one, in this or any other county, who is better prepared to take this job.

His resume, strong as it is, is not the primary reason for my confidence in him. The primary reason can be summed up in one word: integrity. In my 27 years as a judge, he never once misled me, he always did what he said he would do, he was always reliable and his advocacy was zealous, especially when protecting the interests of the children who needed his help the most. This integrity is the reason he has the support of the entire Orleans County legal community – men and women who have spent their careers and, in most cases, their lives, in this county and who have a stake in maintaining the quality of life we enjoy in these small towns and rural countrysides.

We are lucky to have someone with this lifelong dedication to the community. Sandy has lived in this community his entire life. He has  been involved as a leader in Orleans County in many ways. He has quietly helped many people as a youth sports coach, a Hospice and School Board member and as a member of service organizations among many other areas. He and his wife Diane raised their children here. We know him and we can trust him.

If someone of Sandy’s caliber was not willing to succeed me, I would not have felt right about retiring. We are lucky we can look to him to do this often daunting job.

James Punch

Medina

Several attorneys in Orleans County state their support for Sanford Church as next county judge

Posted 10 October 2017 at 12:32 pm

Editor:

We, being the attorneys residing and practicing law in Orleans County, wholeheartedly support and endorse Sandy Church for Orleans County Judge.

Sandy has the knowledge, experience and qualifications necessary to fill this crucially important judicial post in our great County.

As a lifelong resident, he has deep roots in Orleans County and has been outstanding in his professional and community service.  He has earned, and enjoys, the highest respect from both his fellow attorneys and from the community at large. Sandy has dedicated the entirety of his 32 years at the practice of law on behalf of the children, families, and good people of Orleans County.   He is highly qualified to serve as judge in County Court, Family Court, Surrogates Court and Supreme Court.

In Sandy’s early career, he served in the District Attorney’s Offices under then District Attorney James Punch, and with the current District Attorney, Joseph Cardone. Sandy has served the past 20 years as the Orleans County Public Defender and continues to have a great working relationship with the District Attorney’s office as well as all Judges and Magistrates in our County.

We are confident that the residents of Orleans County can trust and rely on Sandy Church to fairly and honorably protect them as our County Judge.  We strongly urge all of our Orleans County neighbors and citizens to give this exceptional and worthy candidate their full support and their vote in the upcoming election.

Hon. James P. Punch, retired

Thomas C. Mack, Esq.

Nathan D. Pace, Esq.

Douglas Heath, Esq.

Lance Mark, Esq.

Jeffrey Martin, Esq.

Dana A. Graber, Esq.

Conrad Cropsey, Esq.

Michael O’Keefe, Esq.

John Gavenda, Esq.

Edward Grabowski, Esq.

Andrew Meier, Esq.

David Schubel, Esq.

Kim Hinkley, Esq.

James Bell, Esq.

Joanne Best, Esq.

Kevin Allen, Esq.

Larry R. Koss, Esq.

Russia clearly favored Trump, the master of disinformation

Posted 9 October 2017 at 8:39 pm

Editor:

Formal collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russians? I have my doubts. Russian meddling in the 2016 election? Absolutely!

The question not being focused on enough is why they wanted so badly for Trump to become President. It is the elephant in the room. Our intelligence services agree that Putin wanted Trump to become President.

Why? Why did the Russians see our Presidential election as an irresistible golden opportunity to advance Russian interests at our expense? Face it, folks. They did. Intelligence experts from republican and democratic administrations have admitted it.

So what motivated Putin and company? Why were efforts made by Russian meddlers to sew suspicion and discord in swing states such as Wisconsin and Michigan? Hyping racial tension and a distorted picture of the threats presented by refugees and immigrants helped elect a person who promised to protect America by banning Muslims and building a border wall Mexico would pay for.

Even before the election, candidate Trump did everything he could to demonize the media, those evil people who cannot be trusted to be truthful. The press that our third President and the author of the Declaration of Independence felt was indispensable to a republican form of government could not be counted on, according to the man who said John McCain was a war hero only because he got captured. If you think the Russians didn’t—and don’t—love that stuff, you may be delusional.

Confidence in the independent judiciary considered so vital to a free society, was another casualty of the new master of disinformation. Whenever he disagrees with a judicial finding, the man who knows so little about the Constitution that he can rationalize pardoning Joe Arpaio—a man who thinks you can tell who the Constitution applies to by looking at his/her physical characteristics—takes issue with a judge’s ancestry or dismisses him/her as too liberal or too conservative!

Why wouldn’t the Russians think a President who seriously—though often baselessly—undermines public confidence in the validity of our election outcomes is their kind of guy?

Lately our President has sought to stoke the public’s feelings of resentment over the Federal tax code.  While it certainly can be improved, the desire to pursue making it more equitable need not be achieved at the price of fanning the flames of public distrust in the “evil doers” in Washington, D.C.

Unfortunately for President Trump—who certainly inherited every bit as much mess as any modern President—winning is what it is all about. Ethics?  Smethics! Whatever it takes to win is justifiable.  The end justifies the means, and the chips can fall where they may.

Before dismissing the above as “fake news”, ask yourself to honestly explain what his comments to Billy Bush revealed about him. Explain his disrespect of John McCain and Gold Star Father, Khizr Khan. What did his comment about shooting someone and not losing a vote suggest? The tax returns we haven’t seen are shorthand for, “I don’t really care what you think, folks.” The list goes on, and on, and on.

Admittedly, there may be a method in his madness at times. But when a deficit hawk like Republican Senator Bob Corker can question his stability and competence, and Senator Jeff Flake likens him to the Biblical Flood, it may be time to begin rethinking the narcissist in chief.

Which of the Constitutional grounds for impeachment applied to Bill Clinton? Which of the Constitutional grounds for impeachment might Trump be impeached for? When Presidential historian Douglas Brinkley said months ago there was a certain smell in the air, what was he referring to? Collusion, though possible, is not a pre-requisite in the case of a President who is in way over his head.

Sincerely yours,

Gary Kent

Albion

NY should learn from other states that have struggled with turbine impact on residents

Posted 9 October 2017 at 5:27 pm

Editor:

Will New York State learn from  mistakes made in other areas or will we continue to fall into the same trap?

The small town of Glenmore sits near the other end of the Niagara escarpment in Brown County, Wisconsin. I’ve followed their story from the time Apex “Clean” Energy invaded our beautiful countryside and divided our peaceful little towns.

Duke Energy-owned, Shirley Wind, with just eight 492’ foot turbines, has been nothing short of a nightmare for numerous families living near the project. Ever since the blades on these 2.5 MW industrial turbines began turning, life changed dramatically for at least 20 families. Initially unaware of the correlation between their symptoms and the low frequency noise and infrasonic by-products of wind-generated electricity, more than 50 residents have pleaded to the Brown County Board of Health for help.

Three families have been forced to abandon their homes to seek relief from the incessant noise and related illnesses. What possible reason, other than inability to live among the turbines, would prompt these families to flee and bear the financial burden of two mortgages?

In 2014, after many studies, including sound and infrasound monitoring, the Brown County Board of Health declared the Shirley Wind Project a “Human Health Hazard.” Valiant efforts by some elected officials and Duke Energy to overturn the ruling have failed, and the declaration remains today.

I wonder how many more complaints would have been registered, had 60 percent of the population within the project not been paid for their silence through “Good Neighbor” agreements with the wind company? What are the chances that residents within these targeted, rural communities could win a battle against a multi-million dollar industrial wind investment, subsidized by the government, yet funded with taxpayer dollars?

The lack of justice in Glenmore is a travesty, and it is not isolated to this small, rural town, but reported in communities around the world where industrial wind projects are sited too close to homes.

Impacted residents, with the support of the Brown County Board of Health, continue to educate lawmakers and Wisconsin State Health officials to increase awareness of the causation of human suffering at Shirley Wind. A nearly four-hour forum recently took place and is available on YouTube by clicking here.

New York State needs to look at Wisconsin when considering such projects as “Lighthouse Wind,” the Apex Clean Energy project targeted for a narrow swath of land along the southern shore of Lake Ontario in Niagara and Orleans Counties. Emplacement of up to 70 industrial wind turbines, suggested to reach heights in excess of 600 feet, could not possibly fit in this residential and farming community without causing extreme hardship on its residents.

I hope lessons learned from Wisconsin, as well as projects worldwide, will prevent New York State from making the same mistake.

Cynthia Hellert

Town of Yates

Quarry company says legislator candidate misses mark in his criticisms of Shelby project

Posted 9 October 2017 at 11:26 am

Editor:

Mr. Capurso of Gaines is running for an at-large position on the Orleans County Legislature. His July 4th letter, which took aim at Frontier Stone’s quarry project in Shelby, illustrates he is uninformed on the issue yet has no hesitation making unsubstantiated claims and misleading statements to the community about a project with over a decade of unrestricted documentation that is available to the public.

The importance of fact checking “often,” as suggested in a July 19th letter by Ms. Fisk, was never more important than it is today when the facts surrounding critical issues facing communities require substantiation.

We offer:

Mr. Capurso: “…it has been shown we have ample existing stone quarries to satisfy future needs.”

Mr. Capurso has offered no proof of this claim. Mined Land Use Plans and public documents will show this statement is factually inaccurate.

Mr. Capurso: “Another quarry would literally undermine the existing ones, hurting their bottom lines and causing a loss in local jobs.”

If the candidate would have you believe this is true than his prior statement as to there being “ample existing stone quarries” would have to be false. Both statements made by Mr. Capurso are intentionally misleading.

Mr. Capurso: “Keep in mind, Frontier Stone typically does not hire locally.”

This statement, made by Mr. Capurso in the present tense, would have readers believe Frontier Stone is currently a local employer, which it is not. Corporate records for the 14 years Frontier Stone was an active employer in the area reflect every member of the workforce was a local hire (1983-1997).

Mr. Capurso: “The DEC is not the failsafe protector of our environment we hope them to be. DEC regulations, in many instances, actually allow for a deterioration in wildlife habitat – very true in this case.”

If the Department of Environment Conservation is not tasked with protecting the state’s natural resources, then what are Mr. Capurso’s credentials as compared to those of the staff at the DEC?

A DEC Administrative Law Judge noted the USFWS “which has the responsibility for the Wildlife Refuge” did not submit objections to Frontier Stone’s quarry project, oral comments or file a petition for party status. He confirmed the DEC and Frontier Stone “have coordinated with the USFWS and addressed the USFWS concerns.”

The judge presiding over the project’s permit proceeding ruled both the Town of Shelby and Citizens for Shelby Preservation “did not provide any evidence, proposed testimony, or other offer of proof to support” their claims of error on the part of Frontier Stone or the DEC. The town and CSP made no “significant or substantive” offers of proof of any negative impacts. Nor could either party disprove the data supplied by the DEC or the verifiable data, studies and expert witness testimony submitted by Frontier Stone.

The candidate’s concern for the potential deterioration of the INWR habitat at the hands of Frontier Stone is hypocritical, considering his lack of concern for same at the hands of Shelby’s Town Board who, unlike Frontier Stone, did not coordinate with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. The town’s New Local Law #3 of 2017 restricts land use for property owners near the refuge but does not limit uses the USFWS already deems destructive to the habitat and prohibits in the refuge.

In a June 19th Facebook post Mr. Capurso wrote: “The Shelby Town Board just passed the Wildlife Protection Overlay District. Kudos. Let’s stop the destructive quarry.”

Without any questions or objections from Mr. Capurso, the sole private citizen in attendance on June 19th, the Shelby Town Board voted unanimously to enact Local Law #3 of 2017. LL3 prohibits mining, other commercial uses and activities in Shelby’s newly-formed “Wildlife Refuge Overlay Protection District” (WROPD). LL3 further outlines two very specific uses the town board will not regulate or limit – ATVs and snowmobiles. “Nothing in this definition shall be read as limiting or regulating the use of snowmobiles or ATV’s on public or private trails” (townofshelbyny.org/Notices/Public Notices/Creating the Wildlife Protection Overlay District, pg. 2).

In direct contrast, the INWR’s website, hunting regulations and permits clearly state the USFWS prohibits the use of ATVs and snowmobiles. This is the case not only because of the “audible and visual disturbances they cause to wildlife but because ATVs, in particular, destroy necessary vegetation.” (Telephonically 7/7/17)

As written, Shelby’s LL3 prohibits numerous uses under the guise of protecting the refuge so “uses allowed in and near the Refuge are consistent with its goals and protecting the habitat within and outside the Refuge that are essential to the Refuge’s viability” (pg. 2).  Review of Negative Declaration documents for LL3 show the Shelby Town Board states the law will have no “impacts on any significant habitat area or any impacts on wildlife” nor will there be any “destruction of large quantities of vegetation.”

In the board’s haste to prohibit mining activities and other uses, without restricting the use of snowmobiles and ATVs, Shelby’s LL3 is contrary to its own stated purpose. The law blatantly fails to protect the habitat from uses previously identified as destructive by the federal government agency dedicated to managing the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge.

Meeting Minutes reflect Mr. Capurso had no questions about the rights and restrictions under LL3 and its potential environmental impact on the refuge. He expressed no concern for Shelby property owners or how LL3 would affect future economic development in the gateway to Orleans County. Is this the type of representation residents of Gaines can anticipate?

Mr. Capurso: “…this quarry is based on the notion that Frontier Stone would attempt to mitigate to the best of their abilities, any negative impacts.”

Mining operations are not notions. They are highly-technical operations monitored by a state regulatory agency. Frontier Stone’s application was analyzed, modified and vetted by experts for over a decade. While there are many opinions by those not credentialed in any field, there were no negative environmental impacts identified for Frontier Stone’s planned mining operation. View FrontierStoneWNY.com | News & Information “7/27/16 DEC Ruling.”

Mr. Capurso: “Blasting …will reverberate…Nesting birds…eagles, ospreys, hawks will be disrupted… Migrating Canadian geese would avoid the sanctuary and suffer”

It has been established, noise from mining operations would reduce to ambient levels within 350 feet of the Wildlife Refuge boundary. See also DEC Draft Permit Conditions 18, 19 and 21 viewable online at Dec.NY.gov, FrontierStoneWNY.com or the Agency of Record –  Shelby Town Hall. Additionally, “Wildlife” and “7/27/16 DEC Ruling” at FrontierStoneWNY.com and the audible sound level data below against Mr. Capurso’s claim that this quarry’s blast would be disruptive.

Permit conditions 18-19 are the result of Mr. Mahar and a team of credentialed experts working in conjunction with the DEC, GCEDC and Vibra-Tech to design a blast in accordance with nanotechnology and semiconductor standards to accommodate the STAMP project. Condition 21 restricts the quarry’s blast to a maximum 133 decibels, which in audible sound levels is 62.5-dBA.

To the human ear, the noise made by a vacuum cleaner or kitchen blender is louder than this quarry’s 62.5-dBA blast. This blast is less noisy than a 103-dBA leaf blower or a lawn mower at 95-dBA, both of which can be heard in use daily on properties surrounding the refuge.  At 62.5-dBA, Frontier’s 30 annual blasts lasting two seconds each would be less frequent, jarring and disruptive than the dozens of shotgun and rifle blasts fired all day in and around the refuge during hunting season. Compare the audible sound level of 62.5-dBA to:

Dishwasher 60 dBA                                                    Snowmobile 73-78 dBA

Food Blender 88 dBA                                                  Bulldozer 93-96 dBA

Vacuum Cleaner 88 dBA                                                         Leaf Blower 103 dBA

Lawn Mower 95-120 dBA                                                       Chain Saw – up to 116 dBA

.22 Caliber Rifle 132-139 dBA                                                12-Gauge Shotgun 150-165 dBA

Mr. Capurso: “A landowner adjacent to the refuge who sells to Frontier Stone will reap thousands.”

There are not now, nor have there ever been, any offers made by Frontier Stone to buy anyone’s land in Shelby. Further, the “landowner adjacent to the refuge” has no interest in selling his land. Those of us born in Orleans County, and agricultural communities like it, know farmers generally prefer not to sell their land.

Mr. Capurso: “But don’t buy their story that this will be a recreation area.”

There is no story. However, there are requirements in the form of a DEC permit, a Reclamation Plan and a Reclamation Plan Map. Frontier Stone must abide by the requirements outlined in the permit and supervised by a regulatory agency to lawfully operate in the state. The permit includes “Mined Land Reclamation Permit Conditions” which outline the area that must be developed and reclaimed.

Mr. Capurso: “Their other water-filled quarries are deemed too dangerous and are off limits to the public.”

Another present tense statement crafted to intentionally mislead people who may not be aware Frontier Stone does not own or operate other quarries. There are no “other water-filled quarries” which are “deemed too dangerous and are off limits to the public” – none whatsoever.

Candidates should be held accountable for the information they present to the public.

As elected officials, they are ultimately expected to be informed on the issues and to administer the law in good faith. If they are so biased they refuse to accurately present verifiable data about a project with over ten years of public documentation, it brings into question their fitness to fairly represent all constituencies as required by the office.

Andina Barone

Mindful Media Group for Frontier Stone, LLC

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