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Wynter Dumont receives Kenzie Scholarship at Buffalo State

Staff Reports Posted 3 February 2017 at 6:14 pm

BUFFALO – Wynter Dumont of Albion is a recipient of the Ross B. Kenzie Family Scholarship. The Kenzie Scholarship is awarded to students who qualify based on high school average, SAT/ACT scores, and ability to achieve academically. To continue to receive the scholarship, students must maintain a 3.0 grade-point average.

Outstanding Citizens and Honor Guard recognized during annual Orleans Hub awards program

Photos by Tom Rivers: Members of the Honor Guard in Orleans County are pictured with their certificates after being named the 2016 ‘Person of the Year” by the Orleans Hub. Pictured, include, from left in front row: Dave Kusmierczak, Adam Johnson, Earl Schmidt and Eric Delano. Second row: Ken Schaal, Fred Heschke, Steve Johnson, Tony Vicknair, Frank Berger, Dave Higgins and Ron Ayrault. Back row: Gary Befus, Bryan Splangler, George Bakeman, Mike Donahue, Steven Goodrich, Bob Blosenhauer, Charles Eberhardt, Al Pulcino and Glenn Whitmore.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 1 February 2017 at 8:40 am

Orleans Hub recognized nine outstanding citizens on Tuesday during an awards program at Hoag Library in Albion. Pictured, front row, include: Bill Menz, Nicole Tuohey and Carol D’Agostino. Back row: Jack Burris, Linda Redfield, Wes Bradley and Holley Ricci-Canham. Missing: Chris Busch and Erik Olsen.

ALBION – Orleans Hub held its annual awards program on Tuesday evening and presented certificates to our annual list of “Outstanding Citizens” and also the “Person of the Year.” About 75 people attended the program at the Hoag Library.

Orleans Hub Editor Tom Rivers and Publisher Karen Sawicz pick the annual winners, looking for people who make extraordinary contributions to the community.

We named the “Honor Guard” as Person of the Year in appreciation for veterans who volunteer at about 100 military funerals each year. The Honor Guard provides a solemn and dignified sendoff, sometimes standing for hours in the freezing cold or blistering heat.

The Honor Guard marches in parades, and attends numerous local community services – Memorial Day, the opening ceremonies for the County Fair, Sept. 11 and Pearl Harbor memorial services, and many other events.

There are Honor Guards in Medina (with members from Lyndonville) and a combined group from Albion and Holley. Each group has about a dozen regular volunteers and they usually range in age from 60 to their early 90s.

The Albion-Holley and Medina groups will often work together for a funeral. They want a good turnout to pay their respects.

Many communities struggle to have enough volunteers for the Honor Guard and veterans may come in from outside the community. Orleans County still has a dedicated corps, but the Honor Guard members worry about that, especially as many of the veterans get older.

Several Honor Guard leaders spoke at Tuesday’s awards program, saying they are grateful for the chance to show respect for the veterans at their funerals.

Orleans Hub presented our fourth annual list of Outstanding Citizens. We picked people who have been volunteering or serving in community causes for many years. They do their good deeds for little to no pay, driven by a love for their community and neighbors.

Here are our picks for Outstanding Citizens for 2016:

Nicole Tuohey: The Medina woman is a prolific fundraiser in the fight against Alzheimer’s. She typically raises about $1,000 each year for the “Walk to End Alzheimer’s.” Tuohey, 26, each year sells about 1,000 paper “elephant links” and creates a chain that is used to kick off the annual “Walk to End Alzheimer’s.” Nicole has Triple X Syndrome. She hasn’t let that disability prevent her from being a tireless advocate against a disease that took the lives of her grandparents, Don and Jane Bradley.

Erik Olsen leads a town meeting during a recent “Old Tyme Day,” an annual celebration at East Shelby Community Bible Church.

Erik Olsen: The leader of East Shelby Community Bible Church has the church dedicated outreach. Every July for the church hosts an “Old Tyme Day” celebration in east Shleby, serving pie, lemonade and hot dogs for a penny. There are horse-drawn rides, candle-making, and other activities with an emphasis on fun – and old-fashioned technology. About 2,000 to 3,000 people attend Old Tyme Day, a huge crowd for the tiny hamlet in East Shelby once known as West Jackson Corners. Church members have created a mini-village across from the church. That village also draws about 500 to 1,000 people for an old-time Christmas celebration.

The church has been growing ever since Olsen and an initial group of 40 people started the church at a former Methodist Episcopal building in 1989. That church building had been empty for 30 years. The East Shelby Community Bible Church has grown so much – about 275 members – it has put an addition on the building.

Carol D’Agostino: The Kendall Junior-Senior High School principal makes numerous community connections as leader of her hometown school. She serves on the boards for the Orleans Economic Development Agency, the Orleans County United Way and the Human Services Council of Orleans County, often bringing back ideas for Kendall to improve opportunities for students and the community. D’Agostino helped start the Kendall Innovations Committee, which brings together leaders from the school district, town government and county to brainstorm ways to promote Kendall. She is a member of the Lawnchair Ladies and led the school through a major capital construction project.

Linda Redfield: The long-time ESL teacher helps students build a better life. In the past 20-plus years, Redfield has helped about 400 farmworkers learn English. Redfield started going to labor camps in 1994, before a school built by the World Life Institute became the base for classes in 1999. The school on Stillwater Road offers evening courses in English, as well as computer literacy, pottery and other programs through a partnership with the Orleans-Niagara BOCES. Several of the students attended the awards program on Tuesday.

Wes Bradley: The Lyndonville resident leads the fund-raising effort that makes Lyndonvilel the place to be each Fourth of July in Orleans County. Bradley works throughout the year raising money on the big show, which tops $20,000. Bradley, a retired teacher, is active in the community in many ways, from serving on the Yates Town Board, to 37 years with the Fire Department and serving as finance chairman for the Lyndonville United Methodist Church. He also serves on the Lyndonville Area Foundation Board of Directors, which distributes more than $100,000 a year to community causes. Bradley also helped start Lyndonville’s annual Christmas celebration in 2013, where residents, businesses or organizations decorate Christmas trees in Veterans’ Park. That has now grown to 61 trees with the community welcoming Santa and singing Christmas carols.

Jack Burris: The Albion resident started a new ministry last year where he and a team of volunteers take a former red delivery truck to stops in Albion, Medina and Holley, alternating sites each week. Hands 4 Hope distributes bags of food and takes prayer requests. “Unfortunately in Orleans County there is a lot more heartache out there than I thought there was,” Burris said. “There are a lot of people in tough circumstances.”

Provided photo: Chris Busch, right, is pictured with Ronan Tynan on Sept. 17. Tynan, one of the biggest names to perform in Orleans County in many years, sang to a capacity crowd at St. Mary’s Catholic Church.

Chris Busch: The chairman of the Orleans Renaissance Group isn’t afraid to aim high and reach for the stars. Last year he and the ORG welcomed famed Irish tenor Ronan Tynan to Medina for a concert at St. Mary’s Catholic Church.

Busch has been an active Medina community member for many years, leading the Tree Board that has helped Medina plant about 1,000 trees in recent years. Busch is chairman of the Medina Planning Board, insisting on design standards in the historic district that have preserved Main Street’s look as if it was a Norman Rockwell painting. Those standards have attracted investment in the downtown from numerous businesses.

Busch last year also helped spearhead the first-time Farm-to-Table Dinner event in Medina on Aug. 4 that attracted 137 people for a fine dining experience on a closed off section of Main Street.

Holly Ricci-Canham: The Carlton woman compiled a book on local farmers, a two-year effort that culminated in 300 pages after intviewing 150 farmers. “Mom & Pop Farming in Orleans County, New York – The past brought to life” is one of the most ambitious local history books in many years. The book includes about 400 photographs and includes reminisces about simple days with lots of hard work. The farms featured in the book were part of a close-knit community with neighborhood schools and churches. Ricci-Canham grew up on a “mom and pop” farm in Kenyonville run by her parents, Pete and “Mike” Ricci. The book covers farm operations throughout county with sections about muck farmers, dairies, fruit and vegetable farms, canning companies, migrant labor camps, “ladies accounts,” technology changes as well as country schools, “kids play” and fairs and celebrations.

Bill Menz: The Medina resident has spent more than a decade working on a monument and memorial outside the former Medina Armory, which has been a YMCA the past 35 years.Menz doesn’t want the original purpose of the building to be forgotten, as a training site for soldiers who served in many wars. Menz helped build the monument that was unveiled in 2008 by the Armory. In recent years he has been raising money for a bronze statue to go on top of the monument. Menz and the Company F Memorial Committee met its $65,000 goal at the end of 2016, with Menz sending out letters, knocking on doors and making numerous phone calls. The 7-foot-high statue could be ready in 2018.

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Winning speech urges Americans to vote, be active citizens

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 26 January 2017 at 8:26 am

Photo by Tom Rivers: Emily Blanchard, a senior at Albion, is congratulated by David Callard, chairman of the Orleans County legislature, after she delivered her speech that won the American Legion Oratorical district level competition recently in Buffalo. Blanchard has advanced to the zone level competition on Feb. 11 in Mount Morris.

Blanchard entitled her 8-minute speech, “The Future of Our Nation.” She spoke of amendments that allowed African Americans and women the right to vote, and another amendment to the Constitution that lowered the voting age from 21 to 18.

“Voting is the key aspect that drives democracy,” she said.

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Albion FFA accepts first prize from Medina Parade of Lights

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 7 January 2017 at 9:45 am

010716_ffaaward

Provided photo: Jim Hancock, chairman of the Parade of Lights in Medina, presented the first place award to the Albion FFA on Friday. Emilie Barleben, the chapter president at right, is holding the plaque. The FFA also received a $1,000 first place prize.

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Photo by Tom Rivers: The Albion FFA was grand champion of Parade of Lights on Nov. 26. There were 34 entries. The FFA won with a Candy Land themed float that included 10,000 lights.

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Medina woman named NY student of the year by continuing education association

Staff Reports Posted 5 January 2017 at 9:40 am
Maria Castaneda

Maria Castaneda

Maria Castaneda, a Medina woman who is a continuing education student at the Orleans/Niagara BOCES, has been named a “student of the year” by New York Association for Continuing and Community Education.

She was among 21 students state-wide honored during a recent conference in Latham. Nicole Sarratori and Walter Stewart, Niagara County residents in the Orleans/Niagara BOCES program, also were recognized at the annual conference on Oct. 25.

When Maria moved to the United States from Mexico in 1994, she only had a sixth grade education. She and her husband spent eight years as migrant farmworkers following the crops from oranges in Florida, cucumbers in Ohio and apples in New York.

The frequent moves from north to south, with their young daughter in tow, meant Maria’s young daughter would be forced to repeat first grade. Maria insisted to her husband that she would stay behind in New York so their daughter could get a better education and not be forced to change schools so frequently.

While her husband continued the migrant circuit, they had two more children. Maria took a job in a greenhouse and decided to obtain her goal of being an American citizen. She knew the value of education and wanted a better life for herself and her family.

In 2014, at the age of 43, she entered the Orleans/Niagara BOCES program at the World Life Institute Education Center in Waterport and started to learn English and prepare for citizenship. Maria worked hard and moved along quickly in her citizenship class, mastered writing and grammar skills and enthusiastically learning concepts of civics and US history.

Unfortunately, some devastating news and events forced her to withdraw from class temporarily. Maria’s beloved mother passed away in Mexico while she and her husband were going through a divorce. When she returned to class she worked very hard to catch up and received more devastating news that two cousins had been murdered in Mexico.

Despite all the heartache, she focused on her goals and on Sept. 16, Maria stood with citizens from 72 nations at SUNY Brockport and became an American citizen and registered to vote the very same day.

For more on NYACCE and the student of the year winners, click here.

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2016 Person of the Year: Honor Guard

Photos by Tom Rivers: Veterans, including Fred Heschke (center), stand during Memorial Day service on May 30 at State Street Park in Medina. The Honor Guard attends numerous community events each year.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 1 January 2017 at 12:36 pm
The Honor Guard from Albion-Holley and Medina attend about 100 military funerals each year.

The Honor Guard from Albion-Holley and Medina attend about 100 military funerals each year.

They attend about 100 funerals each year for veterans, providing a solemn and dignified sendoff, sometimes standing for hours in the freezing cold or blistering heat.

The Honor Guard marches in parades, and attends numerous local community services – Memorial Day, the opening ceremonies for the County Fair, Sept. 11 and Pearl Harbor memorial services, and many other events.

There are Honor Guards in Medina and a combined group from Albion and Holley. Each group has about a dozen regular volunteers and they usually range in age from 60 to their early 90s.

The Albion-Holley and Medina groups will often work together for a funeral. They want a good turnout to pay their respects.

World War II veteran Michael Paduchak, right, and George Blakeman, a member of the Marine Corps League in Albion, salute during the flag-raising ceremony in July 2013 to kick off the Orleans County 4-H Fair.

World War II veteran Michael Paduchak, right, and George Bakeman, a member of the Marine Corps League in Albion, salute during the flag-raising ceremony in July 2013 to kick off the Orleans County 4-H Fair.

Holley and Albion have been working in a combined unit for about 20 years. Some of the members in the Honor Guard are World War II veterans in their 90s.

Many communities struggle to have enough volunteers for the Honor Guard and veterans may come in from outside the community.

Orleans County still has a dedicated corps, but the Honor Guard members worry about that, especially as many of the veterans get older.

“We are always looking for people,” said Jim Freas, who leads the group from Medina.

Freas, 78, said the Honor Guard from Medina has 9 to 14 regular members. They go to about 40-50 funerals a year, as well as many community events.

Freas said the military funerals are a priority. The Honor Guard will fold the American flag and present it to the veteran’s family. They will give a gun salute and play Taps, either with a live bugler or with a recording.

Sometimes they even serve as pallbearers and the chaplain may be asked to pray.

“I’m very proud to do it,” Freas said. “I think every veteran deserves the honor of a military funeral.”

The Honor Guard concluded a program on May 26 at Mount Albion Cemetery when a new plaque was dedicated for Civil War veterans.

The Honor Guard concluded a program on May 26 at Mount Albion Cemetery when a new plaque was dedicated for Civil War veterans.

Every veteran who has been honorably discharged is entitled to a military funeral, free of charge. The Honor Guard detail needs to include at least two members of the Armed Forces. The veteran is also entitled to ceremony that includes the folding of a flag and the playing of Taps.

The Honor Guard provides a presence at the funeral for Frank Sidari on April 25, 2015. Sidari, 90, served in World War II.

The Honor Guard provides a presence at the funeral for Frank Sidari on April 25, 2015. Sidari, 90, served in World War II.

Earl Schmidt, director of the Veterans Service Agency in Orleans County, said the Honor Guard attends about 100 military funerals each year in the county.

“The veterans in the Honor Guard help each other,” Schmidt said. “It’s showing respect for the veterans who served their country.”

Schmidt worries about the Honor Guard in 10-15 years. The group will need other veterans to continue.

“Most of the younger veterans are working and working longer,” Schmidt said. “I’m grateful for the older vets being out there, respecting what America is all about.”

The Honor Guard will be recognized during an awards program in early 2017.

The Honor Guard, including Adam Johnson at right, marches in the Memorial Day Parade in Medina on May 30.

The Honor Guard, including Adam Johnson at right, marches in the Memorial Day Parade in Medina on May 30.

Markeya Lucas-Drisdom of Albion, a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, served in the Honor Guard during a Veterans' Day observance on Nov. 11, 2015 in Albion.

Markeya Lucas-Drisdom of Albion, a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, served in the Honor Guard during a Veterans’ Day observance on Nov. 11, 2015 in Albion.

The Honor Guard marches along Main Street in Albion on Memorial Day, May 30, 2016. The Honor Guard often get the loudest applause in parades with many also saluting the veterans.

The Honor Guard marches along Main Street in Albion on Memorial Day, May 30, 2016. The Honor Guard often receives the loudest applause in parades with many also saluting the veterans.

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GCC President appointed Middle States Commissioner

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 29 December 2016 at 9:51 am
Dr. James Sunser

Dr. James Sunser

Press Release, GCC

BATAVIA – In sports, it’s the MVP or most valuable player. In journalism and the arts, it’s a Pulitzer Prize. Film has its Oscars and Academy Awards, and television has the Emmy Awards. But in the serious business of higher education, standards of excellence and adherence to quality are gauged by the Commission on Higher Education, a voluntary, non-government, regional membership association that assures institutional accountability, improvement and innovation through a rigorous application of standards within a peer reviewed process.

Dr. James M. Sunser, president of Genesee Community College, was recently appointed as one of 26 commissioners (board members) of the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, which oversees 530 colleges and universities within New York State, as well as Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey Pennsylvania, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. He was selected from 85 nominations for just three open seats, and he is one of the few community college presidents to serve as commissioner.

The Commission is recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council on Higher Education Accreditation to accredit degree-granting institutions which offer one or more post-secondary educational programs of at least one academic year. Dr. Sunser joins the team of academic leaders who help define, maintain and promote educational excellence across many institutions with diverse missions, student populations and resources. Prior to his appointment as a commissioner, he served as a chairman or a member of an evaluation team within the peer-review process on more than a dozen occasions over the past 20 years.

To earn and retain accreditation through MSCHE, each institution of higher education undergoes a multi-stage accreditation review process every ten years that begins with an intensive self-study.

The institution appoints a steering committee and working groups, and organizes campus-wide discussions to prepare a comprehensive Self-Study Report focused on specific accreditation standards. The Report also helps frame the three-day site visit by an assigned evaluation team made up of members from peer institutions.

After careful review of the Self-Study Report and numerous on-campus interviews, the evaluation team chair compiles an Evaluation Report summarizing the team’s overall findings. In the end, the commissioners of MSCHE can affirm accreditation, require follow-up action, or remove accreditation.

Ironically, Genesee Community College is currently undergoing its decennial evaluation and is in the final stages of completing its 150+ page Self-Study Report with its MSCHE site visit scheduled April 2-5, 2017. (To avoid all conflicts of interest, the commissioners recluse themselves from all discussions involving their own institutions of employment.)

President Sunser is a native of Syracuse and has spent the majority of his professional career in higher education. He is a graduate of Onondaga Community College, earned his BS degree from Syracuse University, an MS from SUNY College at Brockport, and a Certificate of Advanced Study and his Ed.D. Degree from the University of Rochester. He came to GCC in 2011, after working at Onondaga Community College in several capacities including as the bursar and vice president for finance, and vice president for continuing and extended learning.

“I am truly honored to be a part of such an important organization within higher education,” President Sunser said of his new appointment. “Accreditation is the lynch pin that holds higher education together. From setting policy to the self-assessments, team reviews during on-site visits, Middle States has imparted leadership in higher ed throughout its nearly 100-year history.”

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GCC honors top students and instructors of the fall semester at Albion, Medina centers

Posted 29 December 2016 at 8:39 am

Press Release, GCC

The Albion and Medina Campus Centers of Genesee Community College are pleased to announce the Fall 2016 Students and Instructors of the Semester. Each semester, one student and one instructor at each campus center are awarded the honor for outstanding academic or teaching performance.

Albion Campus Center

Holley Dawson

Holley Dawson

Holly Dawson has been chosen as the Instructor of the Semester at the Albion Campus Center for the fall semester. She teaches History at the Albion and Medina Campus Centers, and also teaches at Erie Community College. Holly graduated from North Tonawanda High School and earned degrees from Niagara County Community, the University at Buffalo and Canisius College.

Students who nominated Holly mentioned that her teaching is, “planned and well thought out,” and she “encourages us to dig deeper into history.” Students also walk away with lessons that extend beyond the classroom and one student shared that, “she challenges us to seek out the truth and to not be afraid to ask questions.”

When asked about her experience at GCC, Dawson said, “GCC is a positive place to work; everyone is kind, helpful, and happy to be here.” She advises new instructors the same advice that was given to her, “have fun!”

Holly resides in North Tonawanda with her husband of 32 years, two sons, and Snowball, her west highland terrier. Outside of the classroom, she enjoys outdoor activities including biking and walking and assisting with the Boy Scouts. She also loves to read and counts the Harry Potter series and the works of Stephanie Evanovich among her favorites.

Elena Mergler

Elena Mergler

Elena Mergler has been selected as the Student of the Semester at the Albion Campus for the fall 2016 semester. Elena will be finishing her degree in Teacher Education this spring. She plans to transfer to Nazareth College and pursue a Bachelor’s in Art Education. Her long-term goal is to become an art teacher.

The instructor that nominated Elena shared that, “Elena produces exceptional work, on time and on task. Her presence also had a positive influence in class and she is a mature contributor, as well as a caring listener.”

In her free time, Elena enjoys art, spending time with her family and many different outdoor activities including hiking, camping, kayaking, horseback riding, zip-lining and sky diving. She credits her family (mom, dad and two sisters) as a major influence in her life. She resides in Albion.

Medina Campus Center

Patrick Seidel

Patrick Seidel

Patrick Seidel has been selected as the Instructor of the Semester at the Medina Campus Center for the fall 2016 semester. He teaches Responding to Emergencies and Fly Fishing and also teaches Physical Education and coaches at Lockport High School, along with being a New York State Coaching Instructor. His most rewarding teaching experience was being named the Western New York Wrestling Coach of the Year.

Pat earned a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Physical Education from The College at Brockport and also obtained a Master’s degree in School District Administration from Niagara University. He enjoys how close and personal GCC and the Medina Campus Center are as an institution.

He was nominated by multiple students that promote him as very interested in how students are doing and as someone who makes sure students are getting the correct information and that it is being understood.

In his personal time, Pat enjoys golfing and fly fishing and notes that his favorite book is Fail Safe. He also enjoys watching the New York Yankees and reading Newsweek. Pat is married and has two children, 11 mini horses, five cats and one dog. He resides in Gasport.

Dennis Wakula

Dennis Wakula

Dennis Wakula has been selected as the Student of the Semester at the Medina Campus

Center for the fall 2016 semester. He is a non-traditional student majoring in Alcohol and Substance Abuse Studies and plans to complete his internship at Hope Haven in Batavia this fall. After graduating from GCC, he plans to transfer to The College at Brockport to further his education.

Prior to attending GCC, Dennis worked in the restaurant industry for over 20 years. He decided to pursue his degree as a means to help people recover from substance abuse, as well as spend more time at home with his wife, Beth. Dennis expressed that his wife and son, Tyler, as well as many good friends and the faculty and staff at GCC are major influences in his life, with regard to pursuing his education.

The instructor that nominated Dennis praised him for being an “A” student, who is, “always the first one to class, ready to work.” When asked about his strengths as a student, Dennis stated, “I try to attend all of my classes so that I don’t miss anything. I don’t procrastinate, and I try to stay ahead in all of my classes. This way, I don’t stress myself out.” His advice to new college students is to pay attention in class, stay current with homework assignments, and most of all, ask for help if you need it.

Dennis has always felt that his GCC instructors and staff really care about student success. Dennis resides in Holley.

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Orchard Manor LPN wins ‘Caring Hearts Award’

Staff Reports Posted 20 December 2016 at 11:44 am
Provided photo: Desiree Braham is pictured with Martin MacKenzie, Administrator at Orchard Manor Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, after she won a “Caring Hearts Award” from the New York State Health Facilities Association.

Provided photo: Desiree Braham is pictured with Martin MacKenzie, Administrator at Orchard Manor Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, after she won a “Caring Hearts Award” from the New York State Health Facilities Association.

Desiree Braham, an LPN at Orchard Manor Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Medina, has received the New York State Health Facilities Association District 10 Caring Hearts Award.

She was nominated by Orchard Manor Family Council members as a “Caring Heart” because of her exemplary dedication, skills, and compassion towards residents.

Braham was honored in December at this year’s Holiday Awards Reception at Fox Valley Country Club in Lancaster. She has followed her mother, aunts and grandmother in becoming a nurse.

Braham worked for two years as a nurse at an assisted living facility in Williamsville prior to coming to Orchard Manor two years ago. She started at Orchard Manor as a Med Nurse and is now a Unit Manager.

“She likes helping others and the medical field interests her,” said Jamie Murphy, activities director and a spokeswoman for Orchard Manor. “From day one, she’s always been willing to pitch in and help her staff or anyone as needed—she’s not above any task.”

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Kludt again tops NY in corn yields

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 19 December 2016 at 10:10 pm
Photo by Tom Rivers: This photo from Aug. 3 shows a field of corn while the sun is setting in Gaines.

Photo by Tom Rivers: This photo from Aug. 3 shows a field of corn while the sun is setting in Gaines.

KENDALL – Matt Kludt from the Kludt Brothers Farm in Kendall is a repeat champion in New York’s annual corn yield contest.

Kludt recorded a yield of 298.5 acres in the No-Till/Strip-Till Non-Irrigated Class. The winning entry was grown with Pioneer seeds, P0843AM, the National Corn Growers Association announced today.

Kludt also won the title last year with 319.74 bushels per acre. Kludt also had the second biggest yield in 2016 at 264.55 bushels.

“The contest provides farmers more than just an opportunity for friendly competition; it generates data that impacts future production practices across the industry,” said Brent Hostetler, chair of NCGA’s Stewardship Action Team. “The techniques first developed by contest winners grow into far-reaching advances, helping farmers across the country excel in a variety of situations.  Our contest emphasizes innovation both from growers and technology providers, thus enabling us to meet the growing demand for food, feed, fuel and fiber.”

Kludt and other state and national winners will be invited to the 2017 Commodities Classic in San Antonio. For more on the contest, click here.

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