Lyndonville/Yates

Lyndonville will celebrate the 4th with fireworks, but no parade

Posted 30 April 2021 at 4:38 pm

Photos by Tom Rivers: Fireworks always provide big exclamation point on the Fourth in Lyndonville. This photo was taken on July 4, 2018.

Press Release, Lyndonville Lions Club

LYNDONVILLE – After a one year hiatus, the Lyndonville Lions Club is moving ahead with efforts to bring back its 4th of July celebration to the Village of Lyndonville.  While some uncertainties remain, current guidelines indicated a safe return of the annual festivities with some modifications.

Noticeably absent this year will be the Main Street Parade.

“It was just not in the cards again this year,” the Lions Club stated. “But as an alternative, a number of the live bands normally appearing in the parade will be asked to appear outdoors in a concert-type setting throughout the afternoon of July 4th.”

It is the hopes of the Lions Club that the day will also feature the return of the annual arts-and-crafts show and booths along with the Lions’ Club fundraising hotdog-and-drink stand.

The Lions’ will  be hosting their traditional chicken barbecue dinner. This year’s chicken dinner will be modified to take-out only. While there will be no indoor dining available this year, everyone is encouraged to bring chairs or a blanket and enjoy their chicken barbecue in a picnic-style setting while also enjoying the live music performances.

Of course, no July 4th in Lyndonville would be complete without the spectacular evening fireworks show – one of the largest in the region.

“We have not cut back at all on this year’s show.” Wes Bradley, Lions’ Fireworks Chairman, assures everyone. The fireworks show begins at 10 p.m. with viewing possible from your vehicle only. Due to current restrictions, there will not be access to the school grounds for viewing.

Detailed information will follow regarding the chicken barbecue/craft show/vendors/band times. The Lyndonville Lions reminds everyone to follow current NY Covid protections and guidelines including masking and social distancing.

This photo from July 4, 2017 shows a big crowd and a long line of fire trucks down Main Street for the parade.

Dollar General gets final approval for new store in downtown Lyndonville

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 27 April 2021 at 12:15 pm

Crosby Whipple building will be demolished to make room for new building

Photo by Tom Rivers: A developer will knock down the Crosby-Whipple building at 30 North Main St. and replace it with a 7,600-square-foot Dollar General with 29 parking spaces. This photo was taken in December.

LYNDONVILLE – A new Dollar General store is coming to Main Street in Lyndonville after the company secured the approvals last week during a joint meeting of the Village of Lyndonville Planning Board and Zoning Board of Appeals.

That follows a vote on March 25 by the Orleans County Planning Board in support of the project.

The Broadway Group in Huntsville, Alabama is the developer for the project. The company is proposing to demolish the Crosby Whipple building at 30 North Main St. and then build the new 7,600-square-foot store. That size store is the smallest model offered by Dollar General, said Tara Mathias, development manager. Most of the Dollar Generals are more than 9,000 square feet.

The parcel of land on Main Street doesn’t give enough room for that size store. The developer is seeking a variance on the rear setback. The village code requires a 50-foot setback from the rear and Dollar General is asking for 30.5 feet, with a variance of 19.5 feet needed.

The Village ZBA approved that variance as well as one allowing for a 9-foot-high retaining wall by the side of the building facing Johnson Creek. The code calls for a maximum height of 6 feet on a retaining wall. The size of the lot didn’t allow enough room to grade the space for a smaller retaining wall, Mathias said during last month’s Orleans County Planning Board meeting.

The code also calls for vegetative buffer as a visual screen, but that wasn’t possible on the east side of the building where there is a 20-foot easement for a waterline. There will instead be a 6-foot-high stockade-style fence on the rear perimeter of the property.

Mathias said the company designed the new store in a way to fit in on a historic Main Street. The store would have 8 to 10 employees and offer convenience for Lyndonville shoppers. Dollar General has another store 3.75 miles away at the corner of routes 63 and 104 in Ridgeway.

Construction could start in June or July with the new site operational before the end of the year, village officials said today.

Lyndonville district not happy with new state requirement for mask wearing

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 14 April 2021 at 8:56 am

School has allowed students to not wear masks when spaced out 6 feet or more

LYNDONVILLE — The school district has had students for in-person classes five days a week throughout the school year. They haven’t been required to wear masks when at their desks, which are spaced apart 6 feet or more.

But new guidance from the State Department of Health on Friday requires masks to be worn at all times by students, except when they are eating. The state reduced the social distancing from 6 to 3 feet. The state also advised that partitions set up in many classrooms and on desks aren’t encouraged because they aren’t proven to be effective.

“Our Board of Education and I fully realize and appreciate that this new required regulation will not be well received by the majority of our community, as the survey results in the summer overwhelmingly supported reduced mask use,” Jason Smith, the district superintendent, wrote in a letter to the community on Tuesday.

Lyndonville will be shifting to a new mask policy on Friday, requiring the face coverings to be worn except at meals.

“I also question and am frustrated by the timing of such a new regulation at this point in the year, as our school has been and is fully committed to a safe, responsible, and reasonable reopening plan where we are providing in-person instruction five days per week,” Smith said. “All that being said, the Board and District are engaged in advocacy and lobbying efforts with local and state officials to address these concerns.”

Some of the board members want to take legal action against the state for requiring the mask policy in cases where social distancing is possible at 6 feet or more.

Lyndonville student artists create videos for rural schools contest

Posted 12 April 2021 at 10:06 am

Press Release, Lyndonville Central School

LYNDONVILLE – Artists in Lyndonville Central School District’s Photography, Studio Art and 5/6 grades recently created videos for the annual Rural Schools Association Video Contest: Our School, Our Community.

Students were instructed to create a video 3 minutes or less that shows the rural school-community connection. Videos could include music, narration, documentaries or short plays. Although school staff were able to assist, each video was required to be student directed. A grand prize winner will be selected from grades K-8 and 9-12 and each will receive $1,000. Additional prizes include: first prize of $500, second prize of $300 and finalist awards.

Lyndonville Central School will share each of the seven videos that were created on social media throughout the month. The videos are currently on the district’s YouTube channel. Links are below for you to enjoy!

Click here for submission number 1.

Click here for submission number 2.

Click here for submission number 3.

Click here for submission number 4.

Click here for submission number 5.

Click here for submission number 6.

Click here for submission number 7.

Lyndonville family sickened, temporarily displaced due to CO leak

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 5 April 2021 at 9:05 am

LYNDONVILLE – A Lyndonville couple and four children have been temporarily displaced from their South Main Street home after a carbon monoxide leak on Saturday night.

Jessica and Kris Skowneski and their family were transported by ambulance to Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester. They have been released and are staying in a hotel.

Their pets also received veterinary care, including oxygen.

A family friend has set up a GoFundMe account to assist the family with their expenses.

County planners approve new Dollar General in downtown Lyndonville

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 25 March 2021 at 9:33 pm

Dollar General’s application for the new store shows this image for the new store in Lyndonville, which is in a historic overlay district on Main Street.

LYNDONVILLE – The Orleans County Planning Board this evening voted in favor of a new Dollar General store in downtown Lyndonville.

The Planning Board recommended the Village of Lyndonville accept the site plan for the project and approve three variances.

The Broadway Group in Huntsville, Alabama is the developer for the project. The company is proposing to demolish the Crosby Whipple building at 30 North Main St. and then build the new 7,600-square-foot store. That size store is the smallest model offered by Dollar General, said Tara Mathias, development manager. Most of the Dollar Generals are more than 9,000 square feet.

The parcel of land doesn’t give enough room for that size store. The developer is seeking a variance on the rear setback. The village code requires a 50-foot setback from the rear and Dollar General is asking for 30.5 feet, with a variance of 19.5 feet needed.

The Orleans County Planning Board supported that variance, as well as one allowing for a 9-foot-high retaining wall by the side of the building facing Johnson Creek. The code calls for a maximum height of 6 feet on a retaining wall. The size of the lot didn’t allow enough room to grade the space for a smaller retaining wall, Mathias said.

The code also calls for vegetative buffer as a visual screen, but that wasn’t possible on the east side of the building where there is a 20-foot easement for a waterline. There will instead be a 6-foot-high stockade-style fence on the rear perimeter of the property.

This aerial Pictometry photo shows the Crosby Whipple building in white, which would be demolished to make room for a new 7,600-square-foot Dollar General next to Johnson Creek.

The new store will replace a building that Mathias said is an “eyesore.” The Planning Board acknowledged the Crosby Whipple building could “age poorly” without proper maintenance.

Mathias said the company designed the new store in a way to fit in on a historic Main Street.

“Our development would beautify the area and it would be compatible with the historic district,” she said.

The store would have 8 to 10 employees and offer convenience for Lyndonville shoppers. Dollar General has another store 3.75 miles away at the corner of routes 63 and 104 in Ridgeway.

The project will go before the Village of Lyndonville Planning Board for a final vote.

Lyndonville honors Academic Excellence recipients

Posted 23 March 2021 at 3:43 pm

Photos and press release from Lyndonville Central School

LYNDONVILLE – The Lyndonville school district acknowledged and honored select students with a breakfast reception last week during the Academic Excellence Award ceremony.

The following students, pictured above, received their Academic Letter for maintaining an average of 92 or above, consecutively, for the past four marking periods: Chelsea Cichocki, Jacob Corser, Lorelei Dillenbeck, Meagan Hardner, Tessa Heideman, Lynlee Hong, Dylan Jisa, Alissa Klinetob, Reagan London, Parker Silversmith, Russell Stephens and Thomas Thaine.

The next group of students honored maintained an average of 92 or above, consecutively, for two years and received a certificate of achievement: Ethan Gardner, Aasiya Huzair, Zayda Moyle, Maddox Stirk, Jack Whipple and Sydney Wilson.

A trophy was presented to the following students for having an average of 92 or above, consecutively, for the past three years: Alexander Barry, Olivia Braley, Nathan Dillenbeck, Erin Kiefer, Emma Maynard, Cameron Paniccia and Lyndsey Snell.

“I would like to congratulate and commend each of these students on their tremendous accomplishments and perseverance,” said Jason Smith, the district superintendent. “The hard work and dedication they have shown, especially this year, is admirable.”

New Dollar General proposal goes before OC Planning Board on Thursday

Photo by Tom Rivers: A developer wants to knock down the Crosby-Whipple building at 30 North Main St. and replace it with a 7,200-square-foot Dollar General with 29 parking spaces. This photo was taken in December.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 22 March 2021 at 12:50 pm

LYNDONVILLE – The Orleans County Planning Board on Thursday will review an application for a new Dollar General store on Main Street.

The Broadway Group, a commercial real estate developer from Huntsville, Alabama, is proposing to demolish and remove the Crosby-Whipple building at 30 North Main St. It would be replaced with a 7,200-square-foot Dollar General with 29 parking spaces.

The site is in a historic district and the building needs a “certificate of appropriateness” from the Village Planning Board.

Tara Mathias, development manager, met in December with Village of Lyndonville Planning Board members through Zoom video conferencing. She said the store can be designed in a way that fits in with the other buildings in the district.

She said the new store would revitalize the downtown and be convenient to the local residents.

The building is on a 1-acre site and will need variances for setback distance. The store is the smallest building offered by Dollar General at 7,200 square feet. Most of the stores are over 9,000 square feet.

The village sent a referral to the Orleans County Planning Board for its review of the project. County planners review projects and offer a recommendation to municipalities. Those recommendations can be rejected with a super-majority vote at the town or village level.

Lyndonville village officials are asking the County Planning Board for its recommendation on whether a variance and the site plan should be approved for the project at 30 North Main St., which is in the Central Business District.

Thursday’s meeting starts at 7 p.m. and will be virtual. For more information, check the Orleans County Planning Board website by clicking here.

The Planning Board will also review two other projects:

• In Shelby there is a referral to the County Planning Board to review the site plan and a special use permit for an outdoor recreation facility at 11380 Main St. in Shelby Center.

• In Albion, the Planning Board will be asked to review the site plan and a special use permit for addition to an existing auto dealership at 4048 Oak Orchard Rd.

Lyndonville/Medina students bring back their school musical

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 21 March 2021 at 7:19 pm

Performance will be shown virtually with no in-person crowd

Photos courtesy of Lyndonville school district: Alissa Klinetob (a Lyndonville senior) is Marmee and Seagan Majchrzak (a Medina sophomore) portrays Beth in Lyndonville/Medina’s production of Little Women.

LYNDONVILLE – It was just over a year ago when Lyndonville and Medina drama students experienced the disappointment of having their show, Mama Mia, cancelled after months of rehearsals. The Covid-19 pandemic closed the curtain on high school musicals shows throughout New York State.

Lyndonville and Medina, which work together on a musical, are back with a new show. They have Covid safeguards in place, including no in-person audience. The show has been filmed and will go “live” online Friday until next Sunday, March 28.

Qasim Huzair (a Lyndonville senior) portrays Professor Bhaer and Sophia Cardone (Medina senior) stars as Jo.

The leads in the shows are wearing clear masks, which won’t conceal their facial expressions, which was important to director Jennifer Trupo.

“Last year was so heartbreaking,” Trupo said about the show being canceled. “A bunch of our seniors never got to make their last bow.”

This year Lyndonville and Medina are performing Little Women. The cast is smaller than recent Lyndonville/Medina musicals, but the show includes a full ensemble and band. There are 23 student sin the cast, and five more students as assistants.

Trupo and the students saw a video of a Buffalo school performing a musical with the clear masks. Trupo wanted similar masks for her students.

“The clear masks make all the difference because this is a very emotional show,” she said. “With fabric masks we couldn’t see facial expressions.”

The musical is based on the novel by Louisa May Alcott, a coming-of-age story set after the Civil War. The plot focuses on the four March sisters— traditional Meg, wild and aspiring writer Jo, timid Beth and romantic Amy.

To ensure the safety of the students and staff, auditions were held online and many of the initial rehearsals were done through Google Meets. The cast and crew transitioned to the stage with safeguards in place to finalize and record the production.

Trupo said she is grateful the two schools are all to put on a full show, even if it won’t be in front of a cheering audience.

“We’re so thankful we have our ensembles, and to have a musical,” Trupo said. “We’re so thankful our administration has allowed us to do this and our community is supporting us and that we have this outlet for the kids.”

For information about tickets, click here.

Evie Schultz (a Medina senior) performs the role of Meg and Jacob Corser (a Lyndonville senior) portrays John Brooke.

Photos: Lyndonville Pennysaver building comes down on Main Street

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 8 March 2021 at 2:57 pm

Photos by Ginny Kropf

LYNDONVILLE – Art Hill Excavating of Medina started taking down the Lyndonville Pennysaver Market building at about 8:30 this morning and by 1 p.m. the building was nearly down.

The roof of the building collapsed on Feb. 22 with heavy snow and ice on the roof. The building from 1899 also had suffered deterioration with its support beams.

The Village Board met on Feb. 22 and declared the structure unsafe after an engineer’s inspection.

Aaron Young of AGC Construction in Holley assists his father-in-law Art Hill with the building’s demolition. Young is shown preparing to hook a strap on the teeth of the excavator to pull the front section of the building at Main and Eagle into the rubble, so it wouldn’t fall on Main Street.

Art Hill Excavating owner Jennifer Hill-Young expects the company will be on site most of this week, hauling the demolition debris to a landfill.

Demo of Lyndonville building will take about a week

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 8 March 2021 at 10:24 am

Photos by Tom Rivers

LYNDONVILLE – Art Hill Excavating begins taking down the Lyndonville Pennysaver Market building this morning.

Art Hill is operating the excavator. His son-in-law, Aaron Young of AGC Construction in Holley, is in the lift as a guide and to keep an eye on the demolition. (Click here to see a video of some of the demolition.)

Hill started in the back of the building and plans to slowly work through the site, a dominant structure at the corner of Main and Eagle streets in the village.

The Village Board declared the site an unsafe structure after the roof collapsed on Feb. 22.

The support beams in the back of the building were badly decayed, Hill said.

“They were like powder,” he said.

Hill’s daughter Jennifer Hill-Young is the owner of Art Hill Excavating and her father is the vice president. They said the demolition of the building is planned to take five days. The building should be knocked down by later this afternoon. Hill will then work to remove the materials the rest of the week.

Hill-Young said it is a delicate demolition because of the presence of Main Street in the front of the building, power lines on two sides and a neighboring, adjoining structure.

Before the demolition started, her husband, Aaron Young, went inside the building on the second floor and put in straps to pull the walls in as the excavator worked through the structure.

Robert Smith, a Lyndonville native who now lives in California, owns the building and three others on Main Street. He had grand plans for the Pennysaver site with hotel rooms and retail space. He has been working to transform the block of four structures.

The Pennysaver Market closed in April 2013 after 35 years in business by Sharon Gray. She offered grocery items, hardware, videos, a deli, finger foods and pizza. The market was the first job for many teen-agers in the Lyndonville community.

Lyndonville’s Pennysaver building expected to be torn down this morning

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 8 March 2021 at 8:07 am

LYNDONVILLE – A part of Lyndonville’s Main Street for more than a century is expected to be knocked down today.

The roof on the Pennysaver building collapsed on the morning of Feb. 22, making the building an unsafe structure, village officials said.

The Village Board met Feb. 22 and declared the building an emergency and a threat to the community.

“It’s a bad situation in a bad spot,” Mayor John Belson said at the meeting.

The village has worked with the building owner, Robert Smith, on a demolition plan. Smith owns the Pennysaver site and three others on Main Street.

The area near the Pennysaver has been blocked off to pedestrians and traffic. The village cordoned off the area in front of the building and part of Eagle Street near Main Street.

The demolition is expected to start around 8:30 this morning.

The building was last used by the Pennysaver Market. It closed in April 2013 after 35 years in business by Sharon Gray. She initially offered grocery items and then expanded to hardware, videos, a deli, finger foods and pizza.

Lyndonville, with only a part-time officer, will institute police policies to meet state requirements

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 24 February 2021 at 9:45 am

No chokeholds and no bias-based profiling among the standards

Photos by Tom Rivers: Lyndonville Village Trustee Darren Wilson, right, and Mayor John Belson discuss policies for the Lyndonville Police Department on Monday. The village will have a 6 p.m. public hearing on March 29 for the community to comment on the new policies.

LYNDONVILLE – The village, which only has one part-time police officer, is working to adopt policies for the department to be in line with an executive order from Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

All law enforcement s agencies in the state, regardless of size, need to submit a plan to the state by April 1. That plan needs to include the department’s use of firearms and force, efforts to build community relationships, a policy against bias-based profiling and how the departments investigate hate crimes.

Lyndonville currently doesn’t have those policies on the books but will be adding them to meet the state deadline. The Village Board discussed the policies on Monday afternoon and will continue the discussion during its March 1 board meeting. The village will have a 6 p.m. public hearing on March 29 to take comments form the community. Residents can also submit written comments online through the village website. (Click here for more information.)

The police patrol car is pictured on Monday afternoon outside the Village Hall on Main Street. The village has one part-time officer.

Bill Larkin has served as the village’s part-time officer since 2006. The mayor, currently John Belson, oversees the department. The officer does road patrol, and enforces local and state laws in a village of 838 residents in 1 square mile.

The officer investigates criminal and civil complaints, as well as domestic disputes and family matters. The officer responds to intrusion alarms and motor vehicle accidents.

Lyndonville is using the policies from the Orleans County Sheriff’s Office as a model to meet the state requirements. Drafts of those policies can be reviewed by clicking here.

Some highlights of the proposed policies include:

Community Relations: Police officers shall be courteous, furnish their name and badge number, and “must treat persons with as much respect as that person will allow. They also must be mindful that the people with whom they are dealing are individuals, with human emotions and needs.”

The Police Department participates in many community events, including the Fourth of July celebration, Halloween, Christmas in Lyndonville celebration, Memorial Day and also events at the school district. The department “is committed to building a stronger community by building trust and relationships through community policing,” the policy states.

Use of Force: The Lyndonville PD bans use of chokeholds.

Police officers, after completing firearms training, shall carry a firearm while on duty. After the required training, sworn officers will carry OC (oleoresin capsicum) spray, a baton or ASP (Armament Systems and Procedures) and an EMD (Electro-Muscular Disruption) system, commonly referred to as an X-26 Taser, the policy states.

Police officers, in the performance of their duties, as authorized to use reasonable and legitimate force in specific cases. This policy, founded in the standards of federal constitutional requirements and state statutes, provides guidance regarding the use and justification for the use of force, including deadly physical force.

Use of Deadly Force: The Lyndonville Village Police Department personnel may use deadly physical force under the following circumstances, and then only when no other reasonable alternative is available:
A. To defend himself or another person when the officer has reasonable cause to believe there is imminent danger of death or serious physical injury to himself or another;
B. To apprehend a resisting person who is committing or has committed a crime in which deadly physical force is being used or threatened and the officer has reasonable cause to believe that such person will cause death or serious injury unless immediately apprehended;
C. To kill a dangerous animal or an animal so badly injured that humanity requires that it be removed from further suffering. In the case of an injured animal, permission of the owner should be obtained, whenever possible. Care should be taken to protect bystanders from a ricocheting bullet and, if possible, avoid killing of an animal in the presence of children.
D. Members of the Lyndonville Village Police Department shall only fire their weapons at a person to stop and neutralize an assailant to prevent him/her from completing a potentially deadly aggressive act or in the instances as described in this section. For maximum stopping effectiveness and minimal danger to innocent bystanders, the officer should shoot at “available target center mass”. The officer’s intent and purpose is only to stop the deadly aggression or prevent the escape of the subject.
E. No distinction shall be made relative to the age or gender of the intended target of deadly physical force.
F. Self-defense and imminent threat of deadly physical force/serious physical injury shall be the guideline for employing deadly force.

Bias-Based Profiling: The village explicitly states that any racial or ethnic profiling by members of the Police Department is strictly prohibited.

“It is the policy of the Lyndonville Village Police Department that all members will not affect a stop, detention, or search of any person which is motivated by race, color, ethnicity, age, gender or sexual orientation,” the policy states.

Investigation of Hate Crimes: Lyndonville will seek to identify and investigate hate crimes in accordance with the Hate Crimes Act of 2000.

“Any acts or threats of violence, property damage, harassment, intimidation, or other crimes motivated by hate and bias and designed to infringe upon the rights of individuals are viewed very seriously by this agency and shall be given high priority,” the policy states. “This agency shall employ necessary law enforcement resources to identify and arrest hate crime perpetrators. Also, recognizing the particular fears and distress typically suffered by victims, the potential for reprisal and escalation of violence, and the far-reaching negative consequences on the community.”

Roof collapses on Lyndonville’s Pennysaver building

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 22 February 2021 at 5:54 pm

Main Street site will be torn down due to danger to public

Photos by Tom Rivers: The roof on the Pennysaver building at the corner of Main and Eagle streets in Lyndonville collapsed at about 7:45 this morning.

LYNDONVILLE – The Pennysaver building, a dominant structure on Main Street for more than a century, could be gone in the next 24 to 48 hours after the roof collapsed on the building this morning.

The Village Board met this afternoon and declared the building an emergency and a threat to the community.

“It’s a bad situation in a bad spot,” said Mayor John Belson.

The village has contacted the building owner. Robert Smith, a Lyndonville native who now lives in California, owns the building and three others on Main Street. He is working with his insurance company to determine if insurance will cover any of the knockdown and removal of the Pennysaver building.

The area near the building is blocked off to pedestrians and traffic.

Belson said the takedown is the responsibility of the owner and the mayor doesn’t want to wait long to have the building at least knocked in so it’s not in danger of toppling into the street. The village has cordoned off the area in front of the building and part of Eagle Street near Main Street.

The heavy snow and ice is the assumed cause of the roof collapse, but the site also had structural issues. Smith had grand plans for building with hotel rooms and retail space. He has been working to transform the block of four structures.

The building was last used by the Pennysaver Market. It closed in April 2013 after 35 years in business by Sharon Gray. She initially offered grocery items and then expanded to hardware, videos, a deli, finger foods and pizza.

Provided photo: This photo from the inside shows the collapsed roof on the second floor. The roof didn’t fall all the way to the first floor.

Lyndonville had its engineering firm, the MRB Group, come out this afternoon to inspect the building. The firm said it was an unsafe structure. Belson wants quick action by Smith and the insurance company.

The mayor said the building won’t be up for very long.

“In the next 24 to 48 hours that property will be in the ground,” he said.

Here is how the building looked in May 2018.

Yates will pick committee to help celebrate town’s 200th anniversary in 2022

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 13 February 2021 at 5:01 pm

File photo by Tom Rivers: The Yates Town Park is located off Morrison Road, northeast of the Village of Lyndonville. A big upgrade to the park may coincide with the town bicentennial in 2022.

YATES – The Town Board expects to form a committee next month to begin work on celebrating the town’s 200th anniversary in 2022.

Each of the Town Board members – Town Supervisor Jim Simon, Harold Suhr, Susan Hrovat, John Riggi and Jim Whipple – have been asked to name two members to the committee, with the town to formally approve the group in March.

That committee will then be tasked with activities and perhaps mementoes to celebrate the Yates bicentennial.

There is already one big goal to coincide with the bicentennial. Town officials are pushing to have the expansion of the Yates Town Park done next year.

The $2.5 million town park upgrade will be funded 95 percent by the state. It is part of $300 million in state funding for projects along the southshore of Lake Ontario through the Resiliency and Economic Development Initiative (REDI) Commission.

The local share of the Yates project – $126,550 – will be covered with in-kind services by the town Highway Department and also funding by the Lyndonville Area Foundation.

Some highlights of the Yates project include an L-shaped breakwater; pavilion with bathroom and fire place; park activities (kayak boat launch, dock ramp, ADA complaint playground); road, parking, pavement; stone dust trail with benches, garbage can, bike rack and plantings; stormwater; erosion control; sanitary/leach field and water service.