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Sorochty, Carpenter win big in Holley

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 18 June 2013 at 12:00 am

Sorochty

HOLLEY – Village residents gave strong support today to Trustee Brian Sorochty and former Mayor Skip Carpenter. Both were elected to two-year terms on the Village Board.

Sorochty led four candidates with 129 votes, followed by 116 for Carpenter. Former trustees Bill Quaranto, 33 votes, and Nancy Penna, 31, weren’t elected.

Sorochty, 42, was appointed to the Village Board in March by Mayor John Kenney. Sorochty had served eight years on the Planning Board. He also is chairman of the village’s Brownfield Opportunity Area grant project, which is looking for ways to revitalize distressed sites in Holley, including the old high school and the Diaz Chemical property.

Sorochty works as vice president of engineering for DDS Companies. A Holley graduate, he and his wife have two children, ages 7 and 5.

“This community is important to me,” he said. “I see a lot of potential. It’s a great hidden spot.”

Carpenter

He supports the village’s continued push for grant funding. A $250,000 grant awarded in December will help improve several properties in the Public Square. Sorochty would like to see Holley go after a grant through the Local Waterfront Revitalization Program to add a launch for small boats and kayaks along the canal. The camp sites along the canal park could also be upgraded with grant funds, he said.

“Pursuing grants is one way to make this community more appealing to developers,” Sorochty said.

Carpenter, 65, served three terms as mayor. The retired postmaster from Holley hasn’t been on the board in several years. He said he has more time to devote to the village these days.

“I’m retired,” he said. “I have all kinds of time.”

Ultimately, the village needs to grow its tax base to help keep down the tax rate, Carpenter said. That could accomplished with more projects in the village’s business park, which has the lure of low-cost municipal electric. Carpenter would also like to see houses acquired by the Environmental Protection Agency put back on the market. Right now those eight houses are not on the tax rolls.