Find us on Facebook

Former Medina assistant principal cites many positives at district

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 30 November 2016 at 11:41 am
Photo by Tom Rivers: Dr. Michael Weyrauch, principal at the Orleans-Niagara BOCES in Medina, speaks with community members during a forum on Tuesday evening where residents could ask questions to the finalist for district superintendent.

Photo by Tom Rivers: Dr. Michael Weyrauch, principal at the Orleans-Niagara BOCES in Medina, speaks with community members during a forum on Tuesday evening where residents could ask questions to the finalist for district superintendent.

MEDINA – Dr. Michael Weyrauch said kids always come first when running a school district.

He would have a visible presence, greeting students in the morning and afternoon, and keeping student opportunities at the forefront of decision making.

Weyrauch is currently principal at the Orleans-Niagara BOCES in Medina. He works with 640 students from seven school districts. He oversees about 40 staff members and a $5 million budget.

Weyrauch started his career in Medina as a technology teacher 13 years ago.

He moved to administration because he said he wanted to work with more students, and was welcomed by the district to serve as assistant principal at the middle school. He was principal there for four years before going to BOCES to be principal of the education center in Medina.

Not only has Weyrauch been accountable to 2 bosses at BOCES, but he also has worked closely with the superintendents at the seven districts.

“I have a ton of experience at BOCES that I never would have had in a traditional school setting,” he said on Tuesday when he was interviewed as one of three finalists for Medina’s school superintendent.

Weyrauch earned his administration certification from Brockport State College before earning his doctorate in educational leadership at the University of Rochester.

Weyrauch met with teachers, administrators, students and other district stakeholders on Tuesday. He was impressed by the level of commitment by everyone towards the district’s success.

“The students are extremely proud and push themselves to meet the expectations of their teachers,” Weyrauch said at an evening community forum.

He believes in the pursuit of excellence, and preparing students for life after high school, whether in trades, college, the military – whatever the next step may be.

At BOCES, he has brought in numerous career professionals to connect with students, and has pushed for the latest in technology for students and teachers to meet or exceed industry standards.

Weyrauch said a district can’t “give everyone what they want,” but he said with long-term planning a district can stay at the forefront of technology and resources without overburdening the taxpayers.

The superintendent candidate praised the district for recent gains in student achievement, especially with high school Regents. The scores in grades 3 through 8 seem to be at a plateau, Weyrauch said. However, the opt-out movement for standardized tests has left the district without a full sample for a student assessment. He wants to see more data to determine student progress, and then plan for how the district can help students who are struggling to meet standards.

Weyrauch told community members that he would work in collaboration with the Board of Education, teachers, staff and parents.

“You need that supportive mindset that it’s a family with a lot of children,” he said.

He favors the shared services arrangement with Lyndonville, where Lyndonville students play on Medina football and boys soccer teams as well as other shared athletics, and Medina students are part of Lyndonville’s school musical.

Weyrauch also said he would push for improved communication from the district to the community, through social media, the district website and local media, including the Orleans Hub and The Daily News in Batavia.

The district is meeting with the three superintendent finalists this week.

Stephen Lunden, the assistant superintendent at Maryvale, met with school stakeholders on Monday. Dr. Aaron Slack, principal of Lyndonville High School, will meet with several district groups today, including a community forum at 6 p.m. at the district office.

Return to top