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Community should understand negatives that come with large wind turbines

Posted 18 October 2016 at 7:09 am

Editor:

No one selects a community to settle in that has towering wind turbines surrounding it. Proponents of Lighthouse Wind see this as a cure-all for all the economic woes, as some all-embracing savior that somehow transforms Lyndonville to Williamsville.

Lyndonville will be literally surrounded by 650-foot (or higher, as Apex’s Dan Fitzgerald had mentioned this summer) wind turbines.  We have flat terrain here, so there won’t be any hills to hide these.  What is desirable about that?

Don’t you read about the 20 percent of people who have many detrimental health effects from these? Do you feel that you, your family, and friends will not be among that one in five persons who will experience at least one of these?

Are you so willing to gamble that you plug your ears to all the negatives of industrial wind turbines that you will sacrifice the peace and beauty of your town for money?

The rest of us who do not want industrial wind turbines here have read about the Ontario’s stopping all future wind turbine construction. We have read about the World Health Organization’s new health guidelines regarding harmful infrasound.

As a result of the increasing height of new turbines, setbacks are now advised in miles rather than feet. Why would you keep advocating to bring these on and, worse, to malign the group—your own neighbors—who want you to see the problems these things cause?

You cannot plug your ears and keep hoping for the piles of money that are promised by Apex, whose job it is to get these projects started, leaving residents to cope with the permanent destruction that is incentivized by federal tax credits.

You have allowed Apex “folks” (salesmen) to be your personal advisors. Of course their job is to get you to ignore all the realities and to allow Apex to build here. Wake up and see what the rest of the world is now experiencing about industrial wind turbines.

Christine Bronson

Barker