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Collins, on House floor, faults Cuomo for fracking delay

Posted 20 November 2013 at 12:00 am

Press release, Congressman Chris Collins

Congressman Chris Collins (R-Clarence) criticized Gov. Andrew Cuomo today on the House floor for continually delaying hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in New York.

Collins was speaking in support of legislation to limit the ability of the Obama Administration to regulate fracking. The Protecting States’ Rights to Promote American Energy Security Act, which Collins voted for, prevents the federal government from imposing new and burdensome fracking regulations on states.

“In New York we are already facing significant challenges in regards to fracking at the state level. We do not need additional, burdensome federal regulations like those proposed by the Obama Administration, which are over-the-top and step all over the state’s authority to regulate this type of activity,” Collins said.

“Federal ‘one size fits all’ regulations are designed to wrap fracking efforts in endless red tape which will do nothing but slow job creation, decrease domestic energy production and increase the cost of business.”

It is estimated that, if finalized, the new regulations being proposed by the Obama Administration will cost $345 million annually or $96,913 per fracking well.

“States should control their own destiny when it comes to fracking,” Collins said. “In New York, I remain baffled as to why Gov. Cuomo continues to cater to the state’s fringe anti-business interests by upholding the moratorium on fracking. Across the border in Pennsylvania, the economy is growing leaps and bounds because they are taking full advantage of their strategic location along the Marcellus Shale. It is sad that New York is squandering this same opportunity.”

The Protecting States’ Rights to Promote American Energy Security Act also places parameters on a current Environmental Protection Agency study related to fracking and potential impact on drinking water resources. The bill’s provisions will help ensure the EPA study produces an objective evaluation.

“There is a real and legitimate fear that the bloated bureaucracy at the EPA will once again produce an open-ended, biased and non-transparent study,” Collins said. “For any study to be helpful to both decision makers and scientists, it needs to contain an objective risk assessment.”