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Shelby

Community continues to support Knights-Kaderli Memorial Fund

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 2 October 2016 at 8:43 am

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Photos by Tom Rivers

EAST SHELBY – About 200 people walked or ran a 5-kilometer course for the 28th annual event on Saturday to benefit the Knights-Kaderli Memorial Fund. Kelly Schrader Hurrell of Medina, fourth from left, was joined by many friends at the walk.

Hurrell was diagnosed with breast cancer in March. She works for the Job Development Agency for the county. Hurrell’s friends wore pink tie-dyed shirts with a pink ribbon. There were at least 30 people wearing those shirts on Saturday, in a nice surprise for Hurrell.

“We just want to support her while she fights cancer,” said Patty Carpenter, one of her friends since elementary school.

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Anita Weese of Medina, left, and Mary Nemcik of Middleport pick out a Knights-Kaderli shirt inside the East Shelby Fire Hall, which has hosted the event since it started. Karen Curtin, left, volunteered along with Mary (Kaderli) Zelazny and Curtin’s daughter Kalie Curtin.

Zelazny is one of the leaders of the Knights-Kaderli Memorial Fund. It provides about $50,000 annually to Orleans County residents and their families battling cancer. Knights-Kaderli helps about 50 families a year pay for out-of-pocket expenses, co-pays, transportation and other bills. A recipient must be undergoing a cancer treatment and must be an Orleans County resident. “The money all stays local,” Zelazny said.

Knights-Kaderli also tries to connect people with local advocates who have faced cancer. Darlene Rich, a breast cancer survivor, has volunteered as an advocate for the past five-six years. She provides a listening ear and tells people cancer can be beaten.

“Early detection is the key,” she said. “When yu have cancer there is hope.”

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Runners are lined up ready for the start of the race. The were also about 100 gift baskets for a raffle inside the fire hall. The event Saturday typically raises about $20,000 for Knights-Kaderli. A golf tournament in memory of David Millis of Albion also nets about $15,000, while a wine-tasting organized by the Zinkievich family in November raises $10,000.

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About 50 people formed “The Mac Pack” and walked or ran in memory of Elaine McPherson of Medina who passed away from cancer on Sept. 27. She had been a long-time participant of the Knights-Kaderli annual walk. This photo shows people gathered for prayer before the start of the walk/run.

One of the Mac Pack members includes Tom Dujenski. He will give a talk on Monday to discuss his 500-mile walk along el Camino de Santiago (“The Way of St. James”). Dujenski walked in honor of Paul and Elaine McPherson to benefit the Knights-Kaderli Memorial Fund. His presentation will be 4 p.m. at Holy Family Parish, 100 Eagle St.

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Stacey Knights Pellicano welcomes the walkers and runners. After a drizzly morning, the rain stopped just before the race and walk at 11 a.m.

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Carolina Ochoa, left, and Sue Sloper volunteered at the table where people could buy sweatshirts. Sloper was named after her grandmother, Sue Kaderli.

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Runners and walkers head down East Shelby Road at the start of Saturday’s annual Knights-Kaderli run/walk.

For more on the Knights-Kaderli fund, click here.

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Man rebuilds life after being seriously injured when hit by a car a year ago

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 28 September 2016 at 3:22 pm

Benefit for Chris Caldwell set for Sunday at Ridgeway Fire Hall

Photos by Tom Rivers: Chris Caldwell does a push-up on Tuesday. He works hard in physical therapy and doing daily exercises to regain strength and mobility. His left leg was amputated from just above the knee.

Photos by Tom Rivers: Chris Caldwell does a push-up on Tuesday. He works hard in physical therapy and doing daily exercises to regain strength and mobility. His left leg was amputated from just above the knee.

ALBION – Chris Caldwell greets people with a smile and a firm handshake. He is upbeat despite a painful path to recovery after being critically injured about a year ago.

Caldwell was hit by a car on Harrison Road in Shelby on Sept. 7, 2015. The vehicle may have been going 45 miles per hour. Caldwell, 38, was hit from behind while walking on the road. His head hit the windshield and his body went flying.

First responders weren’t optimistic he would survive after he was struck that day. He was flown by Mercy Flight to Erie County Medical Center, where doctors also were grim in predicting Caldwell’s future.

His left leg was shattered and became infected. Doctors tried to save the leg but were forced to amputate it from below the knee on Sept. 25.

Caldwell, who had worked a decade as a heavy equipment operator for C.P. Ward in Rochester, was clinging for his life. He suffered a traumatic brain injury. His ribs on the left side were all broken. He had a collapsed lung. His left arm was also shattered, and he suffered other injuries, including fractured vertebrae.

His mother remembers seeing him the first time at ECMC, looking lifeless with tubes and bandages, and a worry permeating his hospital room.

She knelt by her son and told him to keep fighting, to stay alive for his two sons: Christopher, now 13; and Jackson, 9.

Caldwell’s eyes flickered open at his mother’s words. She prayed for him then, asking God for healing and for strength for the family in the days ahead.

Chris Caldwell is pictured with his mother, Ida Caldwell. She said it is a miracle her son survived and has recovered as much as he has.

Chris Caldwell is pictured with his mother, Ida Caldwell. She said it is a miracle her son survived and has recovered as much as he has.

Caldwell has rebounded, although he has a ways to go. He left the hospital on Dec.17, about 3 ½ months after the accident. He attends physical therapy three times a week in Brockport. He does daily stretches and exercises.

He remembers when he couldn’t hold a glass of water with his left hand. Now he can do push-ups.

“He’s so motivated to make progress,” said his mother, who works as a program coordinator for the advocacy program at The Arc of Orleans.

Caldwell fell twice on Monday. He was frustrated and he said it’s hard to get back up when he falls.

“It’s easier to walk standing up,” he said with a smile.

His recovery has been slowed by the brain injury. The blow to the head damaged the area of the brain that controls mobility. Caldwell is learning to walk all over again, with only one leg this time.

Caldwell grew up in Albion. He was living in his own home in Shelby when he was hit by Danielle Conrad, who was driving drunk on Sept. 7. She was sentenced in April to 1 1/3 to 4 years in state prison for vehicular assault.

In April, Caldwell suffered sepsis, a potentially life-threatening infection.

In February he was denied Social Security short-term disability benefits because officials there believed he could recover in time to be working within a year, his mother said.

She is hopeful her son will continue to make progress. She is thankful for his recovery so far.

“God has carried us,” Ida Caldwell said. “He answered our prayers. He got us through it.”

Caldwell’s friends and family have planned a fund-raiser for this Sunday from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Ridgeway Volunteer Fire Company, 11392 Ridge Rd., Medina.

There will be a basket raffle, silent auction, music and food. The benefit will go towards Caldwell’s continued medical care.

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Medina seeks state grant for sidewalks on Maple Ridge

Photo by Tom Rivers: This section of Maple Ridge Road near Oak Orchard Creek doesn’t have sidewalks despite being a busy area with restaurants, manufacturing plants, GCC and a residential area.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 28 September 2016 at 7:25 am

MEDINA – Village officials are putting together an application for state funding to add sidewalks on Maple Ridge Road.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Aug. 17 announced $98.7 million in state funds is available to support bicycle, pedestrian, multi-use path and transportation-related programs as well as projects that reduce congestion and help to meet the requirements of the Clean Air Act.

Medina wants some of those funds to make a busy thoroughfare safer for pedestrians. There are sidewalks near the Route 63 intersection on Maple Ridge Road, but most of the road lacks sidewalks from Bates Road to the former Ames plaza.

Mayor Michael Sidari notices many people walking along Maple Ridge Road or using motorized wheelchairs. He said the sidewalks would improve safety for many local residents.

The village is working with Labella Associates in Rochester to put together a grant application. Sidari said initial cost estimates are about $1.3 million to extend sidewalks from Bates Road to the Ames plaza. That includes a pedestrian bridge over the Oak Orchard Creek by the Mariachi De Oro restaurant.

Sidari said Maple Ridge has become busier with GCC, manufacturing plants, chain stores and a residential community. The Orleans Economic Development Agency also is working to develop a hotel on Maple Ridge next to the new Pride Pak vegetable processing plant.

The Medina Village Board last week approved a pre-application for the state grant. Sidari said the state is expected to provide feedback on the pre-application, and the village will then submit a final application by Oct. 21. If Medina is approved, it will need to provide a 20 percent local share for the project, which Sidari said could be provided with in-kind services from the Department of Public Works.

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Warrior House receives $1,000 from Metro 10 race in Albion

Posted 25 September 2016 at 8:52 pm

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Provided photo

SHELBY – Organizers of the Metro 10 race presented a $1,000 donation to the Warrior House of WNY on Saturday. That site in West Shelby provides a hunting retreat for wounded veterans.

About 300 participated in the 5- and 10-mile races on Aug. 20 in Albion, where runners pick a team, either Rochester or Buffalo. Rochester has won the first two Metro 10 events. (Next year’s event will be Aug. 19, with the race starting and ending at Bullard Park.)

The photo shows race organizer Thom Jennings, left in center, with former US Marine Corporal Ed Spence of Operation Injured Soldier.

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Many residents praise Shelby for pushing to protect refuge with overlay district

Photo by Tom Rivers: Wendi Pencille, leader of the Citizens for Shelby Preservation, thanks the Shelby Town Board for proposing the Wildlife Refuge Protection District, which would restrict mining, junk yards and other uses that town sees as a threat to the refuge.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 8 September 2016 at 10:12 am

SHELBY – While many speakers said a proposed overlay district to protect the wildlife refuge is a government overreach and attack on local property rights, the Town Board was praised by other community members for seeking to protect the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge.

Wendi Pencille, leader of the Citizens for Shelby Preservation, said the state Department of Environmental Conservation let the community down by not demanding more environmental scrutiny of a proposed 215-acre quarry project on Fletcher Chapel Road.

The Town Board proposed the overlay district about a week after a DEC administrative law judge said on July 27 the quarry didn’t have any issues that needed adjudication or a deeper review.

“We’re very glad the town has decided to do the work the DEC has not done,” Pencille said during a public hearing on Wednesday attended by about 150 people.

Town Hall was crowded for Wednesday's public hearing about an proposed overlay district to restrict quarries and other land uses near the wildlife refuge.

Town Hall was crowded for Wednesday’s public hearing about a proposed overlay district to restrict quarries and other land uses near the wildlife refuge.

Several landowners objected to the overlay district, which includes 3,821 acres within a 3,000-foot buffer north of the refuge. The town has proposed an overlay district that restricts mining, blasting, junk yards, kennels, airports, motor vehicle repair shops, outdoor commercial recreation areas and telecommunication facilities.

Pencille said the State Environmental Quality Review Act is a “fraud.” The Shelby citizens group formed 10 years ago and Pencille said the members have been following the DEC and the SEQR process with the review of the stone quarry.

“It failed to protect one of the most sensitive environmental habitats in the State of New York, a habitat it was designed to protect,” Pencille said.

She said the Local Law could be amended to address some of the issues raised by residents during Wednesday’s public hearing, while keeping the restrictions against the quarry.

Frontier Stone is proposing for a quarry in a residential-agriculture district. It would need the Town Board to change the zoning to industrial to allow for the project.

Several residents urged the town to fight for the refuge. Lorraine Davis of Bigford Road said the quarry would hurt the air and water quality of the immediate area, and disrupt a peaceful neighborhood.

Brian McCarty supports a town proposal to restrict mining near the wildlife refuge.

Brian McCarty supports a town proposal to restrict mining near the wildlife refuge.

“The buffer zone is an excellent idea,” said Brian McCarty, a Dunlap Road resident. He worries if the quarry goes through, other mining companies will look to establish operations near environmentally sensitive areas.

“They will use this as a model to go on every nature preserve and wildlife refuge,” McCarty said. His father lives in Lockport where he said LaFarge has a quarry on Hinman Road that has disrupted a quiet residential area. He urged community members to talk to residents near that quarry.

Local resident Gail Miller also supported the overlay district, saying it’s not unusual for towns to put restrictions on property. “The DEC has failed its responsibility,” she said.

Al Capurso, a Gaines resident, said the refuge deserves the added protection. He urged the town to try to keep the quarry out.

“Money talks and nature walks,” Capurso said.

Dale Root said environmental concerns about a quarry near the refuge have been addressed and the project should go forward.

Dale Root said environmental concerns about a quarry near the refuge have been addressed and the project should go forward.

Another resident, local farmer Dale Root, said Frontier Stone is not putting the refuge in danger.

“There is no evidence showing there will be wildlife destruction,” Root said. “The experts show there will be no problems with the proposal so why can’t it go forward?”

Bill Keppler urged the board to try to preserve the rural character of the community. The open spaces are an asset, drawing people to the community, he said.

Marguerite Sherman, a Medina village trustee, also voiced her support for the overlay district and restrictions on uses near the refuge.

However, another resident, Dick Keppler, said the refuge “is big enough.” Keppler said the town should not “trample on other peoples’ rights” to target restricting the quarry.

Town Supervisor Skip Draper said residents are welcome to comment on the overlay district until Oct. 1. They can submit their concerns to the Town Hall on Salt Works Road.

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Shelby landowners file protest petition over proposed Wildlife Refuge Overlay District

Photos by Tom Rivers: Jim Zelazny speaks against Shelby’s proposed Wildlife Refuge Protection District Law, saying the law would severely restrict property rights on nearly 4,000 acres north of the wildlife refuge. The proposed law would ban a quarry that has been in development for about a decade on the Zelazny family land.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 8 September 2016 at 7:50 am

SHELBY – Landowners representing two thirds of the property in a proposed Wildlife Refuge Protection District have filed a protest petition with the Town of Shelby, saying the proposed law would restrict their ability to use their property.

The Shelby Town Board is looking to establish a “Wildlife Refuge Protection Overlay District” that would ban mining and other uses the town doesn’t think are compatible near the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, such as junk yards, kennels, airports, motor vehicle repair shops, outdoor commercial recreation areas and telecommunication facilities.

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The proposed overlay district would provide a 3,000-foot buffer north of the refuge. (Map created by Orleans County Planning Department.)

Eddie Zelazny of Harrison Road was among several speakers during a hearing on Wednesday to oppose overlay district, which is Local Law No. 2 for 2016. Frontier Stone LLC wants to use 215 acres of Zelazny land in a proposed quarry that would be established in four phases, over 75 years, with 11.6 acres mined in the first 11 years.

Zelazny said the Town Board “is deliberately targeting other private property owners near our land to get my family to abandon this project. That is discriminating.”

Several farmers spoke against the overlay restrictions during the public hearing and also signed the protest petition. Alana Keppler of SK Herefords said the cattle operation relies on telecommunications for maintaining records while they are in the field. She said SK strives to stay up to date with rapidly-changing technology. The ban on telecommunications facilities could be a detriment to SK Herefords in the future, she said.

Todd Roberts, a farmer in Shelby, speaks against the proposed overlay district. He said he shouldn’t be punished as a property owner for having land near the refuge. Roberts said farmers are good stewards of the land.

Todd Roberts, a farmer in Shelby, speaks against the proposed overlay district. He said he shouldn’t be punished as a property owner for having land near the refuge. Roberts said farmers are good stewards of the land.

Another farmer, Todd Roberts, also signed the petition and spoke against the overlay district, seeing it as an attack on property rights.

“I feel like I’m being punished just because I have land near a wildlife refuge,” Roberts told the Town Board.

The overlay district would cover 3,821 acres. Landowners representing 2,500 of the acres in the overlay district, 67 percent of the total, signed the protest petition, which was filed with the town on Wednesday.

That exceeds a 20 percent threshold of acreage in the proposed district, which forces a super-majority vote, requiring at least 4 of the 5 Town Board members to vote for the law for it to pass.

“The Petitioners protest and oppose the Wildlife Refuge Protection District Law because the limitations and constraints that are contained therein would result in significant hardship to them as property owners, including those property owners whose property would be in the proposed Refuge Protection Overlay District,” the petition states.

The restrictions in the proposed law “go well beyond what is needed to protect the health, safety and welfare of property owners and the general community, and simply are not consistent with the wishes voiced by landowners in the Town of Shelby,” according to the petition.

Pete Zeliff said the the overlay district includes many restrictions that would limit property rights and potential projects that would be good for the community.

Pete Zeliff said the the overlay district includes many restrictions that would limit property rights and potential projects that would be good for the community.

Pete Zeliff said the Shelby proposal would thwart any efforts to develop bed and breakfasts, campgrounds, kennels and other potential projects that would benefit the town. He said he is in the early stages of developing a campground for Boy Scouts on his land near the refuge.

He runs the Warrior House, a hunting retreat site for wounded veterans, at his property on Salt Works Road in West Shelby. He doesn’t want that effort to be hurt by the restrictions in the town’s proposed overlay district.

Several residents spoke in favor of the law during Wednesday’s public hearing attended by about 150 people. The Town Board was praised to pushing for the restrictions after the state Department of Environmental Conservation ruled on July 27 that Frontier had satisfied the agency in its review and no “substantive or significant” environmental issues remained to be adjudicated with the project.

The DEC determined in its review that proposed quarry “would have no impact of any significance on the Refuge,” according to the petition filed on Wednesday.

David Mahar, president of Frontier, said Frontier, in a decade of working on the project, has taken steps to protect and enhance the refuge by developing a water management plan that will “get water to the refuge marshes whenever they need it.”

Frontier also has worked with the Genesee County Economic Development Center to ensure the quarry would not have a negative impact on the STAMP site on the southern side of the refuge, he said.

David Mahar, president of Frontier Stone LLC, said Frontier has worked for a decade with consultants and the DEC to ensure a proposed quarry would be a benefit to the refuge and community. Mahar spoke during Wednesday's public hearing at Shelby Town Hall.

David Mahar, president of Frontier Stone LLC, said Frontier has worked for a decade with consultants and the DEC to ensure a proposed quarry would be a benefit to the refuge and community. Mahar spoke during Wednesday’s public hearing at Shelby Town Hall.

Mahar said the company’s project has been rigorously reviewed by the DEC, which examined impacts from blasting, dust and additional traffic on the refuge, the environment, local roads and water resources.

“This operation was designed to benefit the community and the refuge, not harm them,” he said.

Mahar said he has been a faithful attendee of Shelby town meetings for a decade, trying to help town officials understand the quarry project. But he said Shelby town officials have declined to sit down with him to learn the science behind the quarry and how it would help the refuge and community.

The Local Law proposal “not only threatens our ability to be of assistance to the refuge and a positive contributor to this community, it threatens free enterprise –­ mine, the Zelazny’s and all their good neighbors,” Mahar said. “And it hinders economic development.”

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Shelby proposes district to protect wildlife refuge

This map shows the northern portion of the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, along with the proposed Protection Overlay District.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 29 August 2016 at 2:10 pm

SHELBY – The Shelby Town Board is looking to establish a “Wildlife Refuge Protection Overlay District” that would ban mining and other uses the town doesn’t think are compatible near the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge.

The Town Board will have a public hearing on the local law at 7 p.m. on Sept. 7 at the Town Hall on Salt Works Road. Shelby is proposing the district as a 3,000-foot buffer from the refuge border. The district would include 227 parcels or 3,821 acres. Of that land, 3,638 are enrolled in the agricultural district.

The Town Board is looking to establish the the local law after the state Department of Environmental Conservation ruled on July 27 that Frontier Stone won’t need to go to adjudication to resolve any “substantive or significant” environmental issues with a proposed 215-acre quarry on Fletcher Chapel Road.

In his ruling, Administrative Law Judge D. Scott Bassinson said DEC officials can now work towards issuing a permit for the project following completion of the State Environmental Quality Review Act.

Shelby Town Supervisor Skip Draper said the town doesn’t want a quarry so close to the wildlife refuge. Many residents have spoken against the project during DEC hearings. Establishing the Wildlife Refuge Protection Overlay District would establish a new level of regulation to protect natural resources.

The district would ban blasting, mining, junk yards, kennels, airports, motor vehicle repair shops, outdoor commercial recreation areas and telecommunication facilities.

The district also proposed banning agricultural product processing and distribution facilities, but the Orleans County Planning Board last Thursday said those uses should likely be allowed because of the NYS Agriculture and Markets Law. Otherwise, the Planning Board backed the local law.

Frontier Stone is proposing the new quarry and would like to provide lime and some services for the farm community. The proposed quarry would be established in four phases, over 75 years, with 11.6 acres mined in the first 11 years.

Frontier Stone, on its website (click here), says the local law if adopted would “significantly restrict” property rights in Shelby, limit how property can be used, and hinder the ability to sell property for an economic benefit in the future.

Quarry by refuge in Shelby clears DEC hurdle

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 3 August 2016 at 5:32 pm

Judge says no issues need adjudication, Frontier Stone can seek final state permit

SHELBY – A proposed quarry near the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge has cleared a key hurdle from the State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Administrative Law Judge D. Scott Bassinson last week ruled “no issues exist for adjudication” in Frontier Stone’s plan for a 215-acre quarry on Fletcher Chapel Road.
The judge’s decision on July 27 means Frontier won’t have to go to court in a DEC proceeding to resolve “substantive or significant” environmental issues with the project.

Bassinson, in his written decision, said concerns raised by petitioners have been sufficiently addressed by Frontier and DEC staff. The judge said DEC officials can now work towards issuing a permit for the project following completion of the State Environmental Quality Review Act.

“I am pleased the judge recognized that our efforts to develop this project have been diligent and thorough,” said Dave Mahar, president of Frontier Stone. “We look forward to working with local authorities moving forward and appreciate the DEC, town and community for their feedback over the years and for working with us to ensure this operation adheres to the highest operational, safety and environmental standards.”

Mahar has been working on the project for the past 12 years. The proposed quarry would be established in four phases, over 75 years, with 11.6 acres mined in the first 11 years.

Town officials and many nearby residents have opposed the project, fearing a negative impact on the wildlife refuge, the local water table, property values and town roads, as well as other concerns.

But Bassinson ruled the two groups that petitioned for party status, the Shelby Town Board and Citizens for Shelby Preservation, “did not provide any evidence, proposed testimony, or other offer of proof” to support claims that the studies, data and expert analyses developed Frontier Stone’s mining operation were flawed.

Frontier is proposing to mine below the water table with a maximum water withdrawal for quarry dewatering at 554,264 gallons a day. It would be discharged at the southwest corner of the site into an agricultural drainage ditch.

The reclamation objective will be to create two lakes at 35 and 156 acres for recreation or wildlife habitat.

There were concerns about the proposed quarry on the STAMP (Science and Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park) site in nearby Alabama. That 1,250-acre site will accommodate nanotechnology companies including semiconductor 450mm chip fab, flat panel display, solar manufacturing, and advanced manufacturing.

Frontier will install a permanent seismograph monitoring station at the STAMP site and will ensure the quarry’s blast design meets the “quiet site” semiconductor and nanotechnology standards requested by the Genesee County Economic Development Center, which is pushing the STAMP site for high-tech companies.

Frontier Stone also will use Fletcher Chapel Road as the “primary access to the mine site” to “mitigate noise, air quality and safety concerns and maintain aesthetic, recreational and education aspects” of the wildlife refuge.

Frontier, in a news release today, said it will also implement road improvements and full-depth road reclamation on local town roads leading to the quarry site to accommodate increased traffic and enhance the project area’s intersection.

Frontier said it has worked with DEC staff on in-depth evaluations of impacts to local roads, additional truck traffic, blasting levels, dust mitigation, water quality and the migratory patterns and habitat requirements of local species.

Bassinson’s ruling referred to additional revised permit conditions, recommended by DEC staff for increased setbacks.

Frontier said its planned 25-foot setback complied with governing regulations, but DEC and Frontier agreed that, “during the months of May, June and July, there would be no mining activity within Phase 2 mining areas within 350 feet of the southern excavation area limit, which borders the Wildlife Refuge.”

This provision will reduce noise levels to ambient at the property line of the refuge, eliminating noise impacts in the refuge during bird breeding season, Frontier said in a news release today.

Click here for more information from Frontier on the project.

Old-fashioned day provides lots of fun in East Shelby

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 17 July 2016 at 11:00 am

EAST SHELBY – Horses pull a wagon of people for a ride today during Old Tyme Day at the East Shelby Community Bible Church. About 2,000 people attend the annual event, where pie, hot dogs, lemonade and other activities are offered for a penny.

Kids and some adults fire gum balls with a sling shot at a giant cutout of Goliath.

Sophia Johnston of Batavia takes a break with a mule named Lucy, which gave rides to kids during Olde Tyme Day.

These four kids watch a group do square dancing in the center of the recreated West Jackson Corners hamlet.

Jonathan Wasnoch, 17, of Medina works in the blacksmith shop.

Bob Murphy of Oakfield checks on the team of horses before they took another group on a ride. Murphy attends the East Shelby Community Bible Church and works with the horses on Olde Tyme Day.

David Green and other East Shelby firefighters were busy with traffic control during the day.

Church volunteers built this mini replica of the church for the West Jackson Corners hamlet. It was among the new additions to the day’s festival.

Today’s Olde Tyme Day had a Wild West theme and included a holdup of this stagecoach.

Elaine Renouf, left, and Alice Root were among the church volunteers who baked and served 300 pies – 2,400 slices altogether that sold for a penny apiece.

Assemblywoman Corwin announces she won’t seek re-election

Staff Reports Posted 12 July 2016 at 12:00 am
Jane Corwin

Jane Corwin

Jane Corwin, who represents an Assembly district that includes the Town of Shelby in Orleans County, announced today she won’t be seeking re-election to a fifth two-year term.

Corwin of Clarence is among the Republican leaders in the State Assembly. She ran for Congress in 2011, losing a close election to Kathy Hochul, who is now the state’s lieutenant governor.

Corwin’s district was mostly in Erie and Niagara counties, but did include the one Orleans town. She appeared at some functions in Orleans, mostly Republican political events.

“I pride myself in leading by example,” Corwin said in a statement this evening, “and I firmly believe that instituting term limits on state officials will go a long way in ending the corruption and dysfunction in Albany.”

George Maziard, Nic Culver and Jane Corwin

File photo – Assemblywoman Jane Corwin joined former State Sen. George Maziarz and Nic Culver, then 14, during the dedication of a historical marker in September 2014. The marker highlights a famous murder case in West Shelby, when an illiterate German immigrant nearly was executed for a murder he didn’t commit. Corwin helped pay for the marker.

Corwin said she was going to “term myself out” from the State Legislature and give someone else have “the opportunity to represent our community and bring Western New York values to the ‘people’s house.'”

Recently she has pushed for a stronger state response to the opioid overdose crisis and also the “zombie house” problem, where banks own houses but let them sit vacant for many years.

The Republican Party will have to move quickly to find a candidate for the position. The Buffalo News is reporting Corwin’s announcement is just two days before the Thursday deadline for submitting nominating petitions for the Sept. 13 state primary elections.

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