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Lyndonville

61 trees will be lit up at Lyndonville for Christmas celebration

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 3 December 2016 at 9:55 am
File photo by Tom Rivers: Lyndonville last year had 54 trees decorated by the community at Veterans Park. This year the celebration has grown to 61 trees. Santa will stop by the park at 5 to flip a switch, turning on the lights.

File photo by Tom Rivers: Lyndonville last year had 54 trees decorated by the community at Veterans Park. This year the celebration has grown to 61 trees. Santa will stop by the park at 5 to flip a switch, turning on the lights.

LYNDONVILLE – In 2013, Lyndonville started a Christmas event where trees would be decorated by community members and then lit up at Veterans Park.

Lyndonville saw the tree display in Oakfield and its success in bringing the community together and adding a festive display for the holidays.

The first year Lyndonville had 26 trees decorated, and that grew to 43 in 2014 and then 54 last year. Today there will be 61 trees lit up. They will be displayed at the park until just after New Year’s.

Local organizations, businesses and residents pay $30 to sponsor a tree, and then they have to decorate it.

The lights will be turned on for the trees today at 5 p.m., when Santa arrives.

Teri Woodworth, the village clerk, helps coordinate the event. She isn’t surprised to see it grow each year.

“This is a very strong community,” she said. “We’re a small community, but people come out and stand for what we’re about it.”

The Christmas in Lyndonville began at 8 this morning with a community breakfast at the Lyndonville Presbyterian Church. There are events throughout the day, including horse-drawn sleigh rides from 2 to 4:45 p.m., caroling at Veterans Park from 4:30 to 5 p.m., Santa’s arrival and tree lighting at 5 p.m., visit with Santa at Village Hall from 5 to 6:30 p.m., and a Christmas choir LaLaPalooza at the Presbyterian Church.

Click here to see the full schedule.

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Apex says Lighthouse Wind has no negative impact on Niagara Falls base

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 29 November 2016 at 8:19 pm

Company responds to Congressman Collins’ proposed legislation to ban federal tax incentives for projects near military installations

(Editor’s Note: Apex Clean Energy sent this response to Congress Chris Collins continued statements that the proposed Lighthouse Wind project could jeopardize the Niagara Falls Air Force Reserve Station. Collins issued a press release today that he has introduced legislation that would eliminate federal tax credits for wind turbines if they are located within 40 miles of a military installation.)

Here is the statement from Cat Strumlauf, Public Affairs Associate for Apex Clean Energy:

“Apex Clean Energy takes the safety and readiness of our military very seriously, and we work closely with the Department of Defense and its services to ensure our wind energy facilities do not adversely impact military missions. Related to Lighthouse Wind, we have been consulting with the Department of Defense and Niagara Falls Air Force Reserve Station regularly to ensure that any concerns regarding the base’s operations are resolved before the project is built.

“Lighthouse Wind has received a letter directly from the DoD Siting Clearinghouse stating the project is ‘unlikely to impact military testing or training operations in the area.’ More recently, a top official at the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station (NFARS), confirmed that the base’s new KC-135 mission makes the wind turbines a nonissue for the base. According to the military’s own experts, Niagara County residents can be confident that Lighthouse Wind will pose no current or projected mission impact on Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station, which is more than 25 miles from the Lighthouse Wind project area.

“While Apex is expert in the development of wind energy projects, we believe it is appropriate to trust the expertise of the DoD Siting Clearinghouse, as well as that of local military experts and advisors, to assess the potential risk of wind energy projects to their own bases. We believe our professional national security experts are doing their duty and acting in the best interest of our nation, the communities in which they operate, and our armed forces.

“Any structure over 200 feet proposed throughout the country is required to undertake a rigorous system of review by the DoD and FAA required prior to construction. Lighthouse Wind is in the pre-application phase, and as such has not proposed specific turbine models or heights as of yet.  When this final proposal is made, the DoD and FAA will have the chance to weigh in again with their approvals through these review systems.”

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Congressman Collins introduces legislation to ban turbines within 40 miles of military installations

Posted 29 November 2016 at 4:01 pm
File photo by Tom Rivers: The 400-foot-high wind turbines in Sheldon, Wyoming County, are pictured in October 2015.

File photo by Tom Rivers: The 400-foot-high wind turbines in Sheldon, Wyoming County, are pictured in October 2015.

Press Release, Congress Chris Collins

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Congressman Chris Collins (R-Clarence) today introduced legislation that would curb the installation of wind turbines in close proximity to military installations, such as the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station in Niagara Falls.

Recently, Apex Clean Energy has proposed a plan to build 70 turbines amid farms and towns throughout Niagara County. The impact that this plan may have on the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station has raised significant concerns from local residents and lawmakers.

“I cannot condone any activity which puts the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station’s future operations and viability at risk,” said Congressman Collins. “This air base employs over 2,600 people and contributes over $200 million a year to Western New York’s economy. Massive wind turbines built in such close proximity to military installations, such as the ones being proposed in Western New York, can negatively impact a base’s potential new missions and its future operations. I will do everything in my power to ensure the viability of the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station.”

Congressman Collins introduced the “Protection of Military Airfields from Wind Turbine Encroachment Act” in an effort to ensure that any new wind turbines located within a 40-mile radius of a military installation will be deemed ineligible for renewable energy tax credits. Full text of the legislation can be read by clicking here. A companion bill was introduced in the United States Senate by Senator John Cornyn, R-TX.

“Our military installations are crucial to the security of our nation,” continued Congressman Collins. “This legislation ensures that military installations like the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station can fully operate without potential interference from wind turbines, some of which can be as tall as 600 feet.”

“The Department of Defense has been increasingly engaged to express either reservations or objections to potential wind projects across the country, on the basis of military readiness issues and conflicts with military radar systems,” said Dan Engert, Somerset Town Supervisor. “The Lighthouse Wind project in Somerset is very poorly sited for a number of reasons, and I do not think it’s in our government’s best interest to expand wind energy at the expense of military readiness. I am very grateful that Congressman Collins and Senator Cornyn recognize this impact and have introduced legislation in both chambers that will force corporate wind developers to site projects far and away from military installations, like the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station.”

“I fully support Congressman Collins’ proposed legislation to protect military installations from encroachment from industrial wind turbine projects,” said James Simon, Yates Town Supervisor.  “The Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station has a positive economic impact on the Town of Yates.  We are fortunate that the skies above the Town of Yates not only have unrestricted airspace for low flying military aircraft and drones, but also provide unimpeded radar coverage for national defense.”

“We are grateful to Congressman Collins for taking the initiative to propose legislation that will work to protect the future of our air base and the thousands of families and workers who rely on its continued operation,” said Pamela Atwater, President of Save Ontario Shores.  “Save Ontario Shores pledges its full support to this proposed legislation and we look forward to its enactment.” Save Ontario Shores is a local group that was formed to address the concerns relating to the health, safety and welfare of Town of Yates and Town of Somerset taxpayers and residents, in regards to the Lighthouse Wind project being proposed by Apex Clean Energy.”

Congressman Collins has previously taken steps to address this issue. In December 2015, Congressman Collins authored a letter to the Department of Defense and Federal Aviation Administration officials expressing concern about a proposed wind turbine project along the Lake Ontario Shoreline. Full text of the letter can be read by clicking here.

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Lyndonville receives grant for school library

Posted 29 November 2016 at 12:50 pm

Press Release, Lyndonville Central School

LYNDONVILLE – Lyndonville Central School received a $4,000 grant from best-selling author James Patterson to support its school library.

In addition, Scholastic Reading Club will match each dollar of Patterson’s donation with “bonus points” that teachers can use to acquire books and other materials for their classrooms.

“We are grateful for James Patterson’s commitment to school libraries, the Scholastic Reading Club’s dedication to the next generation of thinkers and this grant, which will allow Lyndonville to expand the enrichment opportunities in our library,” said Superintendent Jason Smith.

The grant money will be used to add new technology to the elementary library program. Third- and fourth-grade students have already begun to reap the benefits of this grant through the purchase of a 3D printer. Students have learned how to design on the technology using Tinkercad.

In addition, Lyndonville will purchase Lego Mindstorm sets that will allow students to learn about robotics and create several Raspberry Pi stations to allow our students to learn some basic programming and computer design.

Patterson and Scholastic Reading Club announced in March 2016 that Patterson would donate $1.75 million for school libraries nationwide in the second installment of his School Library Campaign. As part of an ongoing effort to keep books and reading a number one priority in the United States, selected school libraries will be receiving grants ranging from $1,000 to $10,000. Since the grant program’s launch in 2015, Patterson has donated $3.5 million to school libraries nationwide, with all funds are being personally donated by Patterson.

“I’ve made it my mission to underscore the vital role reading plays in children’s lives, and the need to sustain school libraries is at the heart of that mission,” Patterson said.

In the first-ever partnership of its kind, Patterson joined forces with Scholastic Reading Club to administer funding applications to their network of 62,000 schools and 800,000 teachers. Schools entering were asked to share the story of their school library, including past efforts to make improvements and “great ideas to help create a brighter future.”

Patterson personally read and selected the winning recipients of the grants. Based on past winners, school libraries across the country have been using this funding to purchase new books, add bookshelves, make improvements to their catalog systems, and expand their programing.

Click here to see the 407 recipients of the grant funds.

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Dobbins pushing $5 million expansion in Lyndonville

File photo by Tom Rivers: Ward Dobbins is pictured inside H.H. Dobbins in this photo from September. Dobbins is working on a 10,300-square-foot expansion to accommodate a larger packing line.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 21 November 2016 at 8:21 am

LYNDONVILLE – A business that packs about 1 million bushels of apple each year is moving ahead with a $5 million expansion that will include a new packing line with the latest technology.

H.H. Dobbins (Empire Fruit LLC) will put a 10,300-square-foot addition on its complex at 129 West Ave. The added space will accommodate a new state-of-art packing line that can detect internal and external blemishes on fruit.

Right now, Dobbins has workers on the packing lines that sort fruit that doesn’t quite look perfect. The new packing line will have a defect sorter that quickly scans for exterior imperfections in fruit. Another big advantage to the technology will be seeing problems inside the fruit, such as water coring, that aren’t detectable to the human eye, Ward Dobbins, the company owner and chief executive officer, said in an interview in September. (Orleans Hub featured him in article in September because he was honored by the Orleans County Chamber of Commerce.)

Dobbins said the new line won’t displace workers. They will instead be packing boxes and bags of fruit. The new line will increase the volume from 140 bushels packed per hour to 900 bushels, Dobbins said.

The expansion project is estimated to cost $5 million for the new equipment, machinery, fixtures and furnishings, as well as construction of the new space.

The Orleans Economic Development Agency has approved a sales tax abatement that will save H.H. Dobbins $220,864 in sales tax. That is an exemption on the 8 percent tax on an estimated $2,760,800 in taxable purchases of equipment and materials. The EDA board of directors approved the incentive on Nov. 10.

That is the only tax break Dobbins will receive from the EDA for the project. The company isn’t pursuing a property tax discount with the project.

This is the second recent significant expansion and investment by Dobbins. The business last year opened a new 26,240-square-foot controlled atmosphere storage building on Millers Road, about 2 miles from the main packing house on West Avenue.

That $3.4 million project boosted Dobbins’ on-site storage by 300,000 bushels of apples. The CA also acts to put apples “to sleep,” allowing them to be stored for many months, sometimes up to a year.

H.H. Dobbins was started in 1905 and under the leadership of the fourth-generation owner, Ward Dobbins.

Dobbins is working to have the new packing line in production by next harvest season, EDA officials said.

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Lyndonville school district eyes $10.7 million capital project

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 15 November 2016 at 12:38 pm

LYNDONVILLE – School district leaders expect to soon present a $10.7 million capital project to the community, an initiative that would do a host of improvements to the school campus on Housel Avenue.

The district already has $4.5 million in a reserve for the local share of the project. The state is expected to pay about 83 percent of the overall costs.

“We’re getting some needed upgrades and improvements,” said Jason Smith, the district superintendent. “It’s a conservative project that really addresses needs for students, staff and the community.”

The project is focused on the Housel Avenue campus, where students in grades prekindergarten through seniors in high school all attend classes. The former elementary school on Main Street isn’t in the project.

The projects include roof work, new air-conditioning (currently only 1/3 of school has AC), interior renovations (including removing a wall and added two classrooms), lighting improvements, and site work that will add parking spaces and improve traffic flow. It will also add a clearly designated drop-off spot for parents taking their children to school.

The athletic fields will also be improved with drainage, new dugouts, fencing and electric service.

Lyndonville expects the Board of Education will vote on Dec. 12 to send the project to the community for a vote, tentatively planned for Feb. 13.

The project will be paid over 20 years. It won’t result in increased local taxes because the local share already is available in the reserve account, Smith said.

To see more on the project, click here.

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Water tests at Lyndonville show 47 spots on campus have elevated lead levels

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 1 November 2016 at 6:46 pm
File photo by Tom Rivers: Lyndonville's former elementary school closed after the 2011-12 due to declining enrollment. The district tested 25 water sources at the building on Sept. 26 and 60 percent or 15 spots were too high in lead.

File photo by Tom Rivers: Lyndonville’s former elementary school closed after the 2011-12 due to declining enrollment. The district tested 25 water sources at the building on Sept. 26 and 60 percent or 15 spots were too high in lead.

LYNDONVILLE – The results are back on the lead in water sources at Lyndonville Central School.

The district tested 126 locations in the middle/high school and 32 came back with elevated levels of lead in the water.

Although the elementary school is now closed with those students at the middle-high school, the elementary school showed 15 spots with elevated lead levels out of 25 water sources.

The district hired Envoy Environmental Consultants to complete water testing. The company also tested three sources and the bus garage and those were all under the state threshold.

New York State on Sept. 6 passed a new law requiring water in schools be tested for lead. The state gave the school until Oct. 31 to get the tests done. (New York State has determined permissible lead levels in potable water to be 15 parts per billion (ppb). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s permissible level is 20 ppb.)

“The health and safety of students, staff, and visitors remains our top priority and we are committed to ensuring that water in our district’s buildings is safe,” Superintendent Jason Smith said in a statement posted in the district website.

The water sources that tested above state limits in the initial sampling will be remediated, Smith said. The remediation measures could include replacement of plumbing/fixtures or completely shutting down the water source.

Lyndonville’s water sources were all tested on Sept. 26.

Here are the results in the middle/high school, where about 600 students attend classes:

• Of the 126 locations tested, 32 were above 15 ppb.

• Five were identified as kitchen sinks.

• Seven were identified as bathroom sinks.

• Eighteen were identified as classroom sinks.

• Two were identified as drinking water bubblers (drinking fountains).

In the former elementary school:

• Of the 25 locations tested, 15 had elevated lead levels.

The water supply has been shut off to the two drinking fountains with elevated lead levels. Additionally, Smith said signs have been posted by the sinks that indicate “Hand-Washing and/or Cleaning Only” where the water tested above the state limit.

Smith said a letter will be going home to parents on Wednesday with the test results.

Three other schools in Orleans County – Albion, Holley and Medina – are awaiting their results. Kendall also had some classroom sinks and drinking fountains test too high for lead.

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SOS, Collins and Ortt not convinced turbines won’t affect future of Niagara Falls base

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 1 November 2016 at 5:43 pm
Provided photo from Save Ontario Shores: Congressman Chris Collins, R-Clarence, talks to Save Ontario Shores supporters outside the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station on Monday.

Provided photo from Save Ontario Shores: Congressman Chris Collins, R-Clarence, talks to Save Ontario Shores supporters outside the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station on Monday.

NIAGARA FALLS – Save Ontario Shores, a citizens’ group opposed to the Lighthouse Wind turbine project in Somerset and Yates, were joined by Congressman Chris Collins and State Sen. Robert Ortt on Monday, again stating their concerns that the 600-foot-high turbines could jeopardize future missions at the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station.

Just last week, the operations group commander at the base told The Buffalo News the turbines wouldn’t have an impact on the base, which is changing to higher-flying tanker plans next October.

The eight KC-135 tanker planes will fly at altitudes above 3,000 feet, higher than the training missions for C-130 transport planes. Col. Joseph D. Janik told The Buffalo News the turbines are a non-issue because of the planes’ height and travel routes.

Save Ontario Shores said the base’s future missions aren’t fully known and the turbines could be a detriment to the base operations.

SOS also said Apex Clean Energy, developer of the proposed project in Yates and Somerset, has hired a Washington-based lobbying firm, Cassidy and Associates,  to work behind the scenes and promote the Lighthouse Wind project.

“They are well-connected inside the Beltway, and they have been relentless in their efforts to ignore the majority of residents in the towns of Somerset and Yates who have repeatedly gone on record in opposition to the installation of these mammoth wind turbines in our towns,” said Pam Atwater, SOS president.

She said Cassidy and Associates has been hired by the state of New Jersey to help protect several military installations in New Jersey that make up Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, as well as the Earle Naval Weapons Station, the 177th Fight Winger and a Coast Guard Training Center.

“The same firm that is promoting wind turbines here, turbines that could jeopardize the future of NFARS, has been hired by a neighboring state to land a re-fueling mission while keeping an eye on the chief competitors and threats to New Jersey’s military installations,” Atwater said.

Apex has hired Cassidy and Associates to lobby for its industrial wind turbine project in Western New York, which could put NFARS at risk the next time Defense Base Realignment and Closure Commission decides which military installations will close, she said.

“We’ve been fortunate here, twice,” Atwater said.  “The BRAC Commission has voted to save NFARS, but what happens in the next round?”

Collins and Ortt joined SOS outside the base on Monday, speaking against the turbines near the lakeshore in Yates and Somerset.

Apex officials said the local community doesn’t need to worry about the turbines having a negative impact on the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station.

“We are perplexed about why this topic continues to be raised, especially after Lighthouse Wind has received a letter directly from the DoD Siting Clearinghouse stating the project is ‘unlikely to impact military testing or training operations in the area,’” said Cat Strumlauf, a public affairs associate for Apex.

“More recently, a top official at the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station (NFARS), when asked whether the new KC-135 mission makes the wind turbines a nonissue for the base replied, ‘With the new mission, yes.’”

“Niagara County residents can be confident there’s no current or projected mission impact on Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station, which is more than 20 miles from the Lighthouse Wind project area. At this point, it is clear that the concerns being raised about potential impact to the base are unfounded and entirely speculative,” Strumlauf said. “We are surprised at the audacity being shown by these few civilian anti-wind activists in questioning the DoD Siting Clearinghouse as well as the expertise and knowledge of local military experts and advisors about their own base. We trust that our professional national security experts are doing their duty and acting in the best interest of our nation and our armed forces.”

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Lyndonville forms Leo Club for community service

Photos by Tom Rivers: Some of the new members of the Leos Club in Lyndonville are introduced on Wednesday during the Lyndonville Lions Cub meeting at the White Birch Golf Course. The Leos formed last month and will be doing service projects in the school and community.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 27 October 2016 at 10:16 am

LYNDONVILLE – The school has a new army of student ambassadors dedicated to community service and good works.

Thirteen high schoolers are part of the new Leos Club, a youth service organization that is sponsored by the Lions Club.

Lyndonville formed the group after seeing the success of the Leos in Kendall. Students also wanted to step up their involvement in serving the school district and community.

The new Leos were welcomed to the regular Lions Club meeting on Wednesday. Lynne Johnson, the club president, said the students will be “a shot in the arm” for the club, which manages many community service projects throughout the year, including a pumpkin carving event on Saturday at the firehall from 10 a.m. to noon.

Aimee Chaffee, Leos advisor

Aimee Chaffee, Leos advisor

Aimee Chaffee, a special education teacher and AVID instructor at Lyndonville, is serving as the club advisor. She grew up in Lyndonville and saw the good works of the Lions Club, including planning the annual Fourth of July festival, serving people who are blind, providing scholarships and serving in other ways.

She expected students to step forward and want to help in the community and at their school.

“I love these kids,” she said. “They have really good hearts.”

The following are the first members of the Leos Club in Lyndonville: Tamara Huzair (president), Christopher Clark (vice president), Faith Chaffee (treasurer), Shantel Benedict (secretary), Tyler Coyle, Leah Gerety, Dustin Solomon, Savannah Poler, Sawyer Wilson, Jacob Kalson, Hunter Fuller, Nick Hartwig and Allyson Deslatte.

The “L” in Leos represents leadership, while the “E” is for experience and the “O” for opportunity. For more on Leos, click here.

The students will support the Lions Club with some of their programs, including the Christmas tree lighting and celebration on Dec. 3.

“We’re a small club so we’re thankful for the Leos,” Johnson said. “It’s the perfect fit at the perfect time.”

The Leos also have their own programs, including a pet supply drive, where food will be donated to the Orleans County Animal Shelter in Albion. The Leos also are planning events for senior citizens, including a tea and luncheon next Thursday.

Richard Pucher, a retired Lyndonville school superintendent, tells the students they can improve their school, community and themselves through service.

Richard Pucher, a retired Lyndonville school superintendent, tells the students they can improve their school, community and themselves through service.

Richard Pucher, a retired Lyndonville school superintendent, used to run programs and events for the Key Club, the youth service component of Kiwanis.

He listed the many programs by the Lions Cub, including the medical loan closet, sponsorship of a Boy Scout troop, cleanup along Route 63, the Fourth of July festival, scholarships and the efforts to help people, locally and around the world, with their sight.

“The reason we do it is to make Lyndonville a better community,” Pucher said. “Hopefully you can make Lyndonville Central a better school and make yourself a better person as you go through life.”

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Air Reserve Station leader says tall turbines won’t harm base in Niagara Falls

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 26 October 2016 at 11:30 am
File photo by Tom Rivers: Wind turbines that peak at about 400 feet high are pictured last fall in Sheldon, Wyoming County. The town has 75 turbines that stand high above trees. The turbines proposed for Yates and Somerset would be about 600 feet high.

File photo by Tom Rivers: Wind turbines that peak at about 400 feet high are pictured last fall in Sheldon, Wyoming County. The town has 75 turbines that stand high above trees. The turbines proposed for Yates and Somerset would be about 600 feet high.

YATES – The mission is changing at the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station with higher-flying tanker planes expected to replace c-130 transport planes by next October.

The training flights for the eight KC-135 tanker planes will take place at altitudes above 3,000 feet, Col. Joseph D. Janik, operations group commander for the 914th Airlift Wing, told The Buffalo News. (Click here to see ‘Air Force officer debunks claim that wind turbines endanger Niagara Falls base.’)

Apex Clean Energy is proposing about 70 wind turbines in Somerset and Yates that would peak about 620 feet. The turbines would be at least 25 miles from the base in Niagara Falls.

Opponents of “Lighthouse Wind” in Yates and Somerset have said the turbines would have a negative impact on the training missions at the military base, possibly jeopardizing its future in Western New York. Congressman Chris Collins and State Sen. Robert Ortt have spoken out against the turbine project because they said it would harm the base’s mission and contribute to its closure.

Janik told The Buffalo News the turbines are a non-issue because of the planes’ height and travel routes.

“Flying the C-130, some of our tactical low-level routes would take us up to that part of the lakeshore, over Lake Ontario, but with the new tanker, we’ll be at higher altitudes,” he said.

Save Ontario Shores, a citizens’ group opposed to turbine project, said the base’s future missions aren’t fully known and the turbines could be a detriment to the base operations.

Cat Mosely, a spokeswoman for Apex, said she hopes The Buffalo News article “clears up misinformation.”

Apex is working on its application for the project, currently going through the stipulation phase and responding to questions and concerns by 23 parties. Mosely said there will be public comment opportunities throughout the process as the company works to get to the final application phase of the project.

Apex has done its due diligence in showing the turbines won’t have a negative impact on the Niagara Falls base, she said.

“It’s great to put this to bed,” she said about the issue.

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