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Medina

Dialysis site in Medina reopens after renovations

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 23 December 2016 at 10:05 am
Photos by Tom Rivers: Sherri Parker of Akron sits at a dialysis station on Wednesday in Medina. Lake Plains Dialysis reopened on Monday at 11020 W. Center Street after 8 months of renovations.

Photos by Tom Rivers: Sherri Parker of Akron sits at a dialysis station on Wednesday in Medina. Lake Plains Dialysis reopened on Monday at 11020 W. Center Street after 8 months of renovations.

MEDINA – Sherri Parker of Akron is thankful the Lake Plains Dialysis site in Medina reopened this week after eight months of renovations.

Parker has been on dialysis for eight years. The Medina location at 11020 W. Center St. has been close by for her. When it closed for repairs, shifting most patients to a site in Batavia, it meant a much earlier start in the day and a longer commute for Parker and other patients.

Monday the site in Medina, which opened about 20 years ago, was back in business. Parker was there just before 6 in the morning.

“I love it,” Parker said. “It’s nicer and much warmer.”

The dialysis site was closed in April after water damage to the building. The nine dialysis stations were relocated to Lake Plains’ other site in Batavia at 587 East Main St. (Orleans Community Health provides the service for about 100 people at the two locations.)

The Medina site will be adding another station in early 2017. That will allow Lake Plains to serve four more patients who need dialysis. Medina currently has 37 patients and there is a waiting list for 30 patients at the two sites, said Laurie Joslyn, manager of Lake Plains Dialysis.

Laurie Joslyn is manager of the Lake Plains Dialysis Centers in Medina and Batavia. Both sites will be able to add patients in early 2017 after a grant paid for one more station in medina and two in Batavia.

Laurie Joslyn is manager of the Lake Plains Dialysis Centers in Medina and Batavia. Both sites will be able to add patients in early 2017 after a grant paid for one more station in Medina and two in Batavia.

A Rural Access Grant is allowing Lake Plains to add another station in Medina and two in Batavia.

When Medina was closed for eight months, Joslyn said 35 of the 37 patients took dialysis in Batavia while two others found other dialysis sites.

Parker and other Medina patients are thankful the site reopened in medina.

“This is a convenience for me,” Parker said on Wednesday, nearing the end of a four-hour dialysis session.

Parker and other patients receive dialysis three times a week. In Medina, there are two shifts while Batavia provides the service at three different times for people with failing kidneys.

With dialysis, blood is pumped through machines that remove extra water, wastes and chemicals from the blood stream.

Medina has a team of certified technicians, registered nurses and LPNs working with patients. There is also a social worker and dietician on staff to help patients.

Parker said she prefers the Medina site, which is less hectic than many other dialysis centers that typically have 20 to 30 stations.

“It’s quieter here with less interruptions,” she said.

The Medina site was once a roller-skating rink and then a manufacturing site. With the recent renovations the site has new flooring (a non-skid laminate replaced carpet), new drywall and wallboard, fresh paint and renovated lobby, as well as other improvements.

The Medina site is located in a former roller-skating rink on West Center Street.

The Medina site is located in a former roller-skating rink on West Center Street.

Joslyn, the dialysis manager, has worked for Lake Plains for 15 years, starting as a nurse. She said the dialysis sites are their own communities, with patients and staff getting to know each other.

The reopening of the Medina site will make the traveling easier for many of the patients, Joslyn said.

Parker said she was thrilled when Joslyn announced it would reopen on Monday.

“I was so excited I couldn’t sleep,” Parker said.

For more on Lake Plains Dialysis, click here.

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Medina officer tells students that police work hard to build trust with community

Posted 22 December 2016 at 8:31 am
Provided photo: Medina Police Officer Brian Marsceill recently visited with the Security and Law Enforcement classes at the Orleans Career and Technical Education Center. Pictured include, from left: Teacher Gene Newman, Colton Bohall (Royalton Hartland), Hannah Adams (Medina), Officer Brian Marsceill, Lindsay Fulwell (Medina), Elizabeth Keyes (Royalton Hartland) and Teacher Steve Browning. 

Provided photo: Medina Police Officer Brian Marsceill recently visited with the Security and Law Enforcement classes at the Orleans Career and Technical Education Center. Pictured include, from left: Teacher Gene Newman, Colton Bohall (Royalton Hartland), Hannah Adams (Medina), Officer Brian Marsceill, Lindsay Fulwell (Medina), Elizabeth Keyes (Royalton Hartland) and Teacher Steve Browning.

Press Release, Orleans/Niagara BOCES

MEDINA – Recently in the Security and Law Enforcement classes at the Orleans Career and Technical Education Center, Medina Police Officer Brian Marsceill stopped in to talk to the students about the role of police in a community.

The conversation took an interesting direction about how the press and social media have portrayed law enforcement in light of current events.

Officer Marsceill was invited by teachers Steve Browning and Gene Newman to talk talked about what it takes to become a police officer, what is involved in the exam and interview that is given and his own career path.

Marsceill also opened a dialogue about how police are perceived by the public with the national coverage of assaults and shootings and the general feeling of mistrust in local communities towards law enforcement.

He told the students like any career, you will have people that are not good at doing their jobs and how that is affecting law enforcement and their role in the community.

“It’s really pretty sad that when you talk to children to introduce yourselves and build a relationship and their parents will pull them away and tell them not to talk to us,” Marsceill said. “They tell them that we will take them away if they are bad. It makes our job ten times harder. One of our goals as a police officer is to have transparency with the public and keep the lines of communication open. Bad officers should be held accountable for their poor conduct, but it is not fair to view us all in that light. Most of us got into this career to help people.”

The students were cautioned not to believe everything posted on Facebook and Twitter and in some cases in the media.

“People can say whatever they want on social media and many times they are lies,” he said. “Videos can be edited or not show the whole situation. The news asks very pointed questions so they can write the story they want. It has become a big problem. Many police departments are giving more training on how to deal with the community and change that negative perception.

“We are also getting more training on less lethal methods to take someone down, like tasers, pepper spray and bean bag shotguns. We are trying to change the way people view who we are and what our role is. Involvement is our community is very important and we are working hard to build that trust with the people we have sworn to protect.”

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Medina gives overwhelming support for capital project

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 21 December 2016 at 8:41 pm

122116_vetspark2MEDINA – School district voters gave strong support for two propositions today that total $34 million in school improvements.

Proposition 1 passed, 372-43, and includes $32,588,000 for a slew of improvements at all three school buildings, the bus garage, and Vet’s Park. There would also be a new access road between Oak Orchard Elementary School and Clifford Wise Middle School.

Proposition 2 passed, 367-45, and includes $1,425,000 to allow for an expansion at Vet’s Park by acquiring 1.6 acres of land south of the park, adding permanent bleachers, more lighting, a new press box in the bleacher system, new fencing and additional synthetic turf in the current press box location.

The project won’t increase local taxes because Medina already has $2,323,182 set aside in reserve funds for its share of the $34 million project, Tom Cox, interim school district superintendent, said at a public hearing last week.

“We feel we have been able to address the compelling needs,” Cox said at the public hearing. “It’s pretty much nuts and bolts but that doesn’t mean there isn’t some pretty nice stuff that will happen.”

Some work at Vet’s Park may be able to be completed this spring through fall, while the school building work is eyed for 2018, depending on State Education Department approvals.

Here is how they break down of Proposition 1:

  • Health, Safety and Code Compliance – $7,691,000

The district will replace aging bus lifts, upgrade the fire alarm systems, door hardware and toilets.

The roof, ceiling panels and wall panels will all be upgraded at the swimming pool.

Windows and a generator will be replaced at Oak Orchard Elementary School. Those windows are more than a half century old.

The project expenses are broken out to $3,637,300 at the elementary school, $2,562,400 at the middle school, $892,800 at high school, $561,500 at bus garage and $7,000 at concession stand.

  • HVAC – $13,596,300

All three school buildings, as well as the bus garage, will have HVAC totally overhauled with $4,728,200 planned for the high school, $4,115,200 at the middle school, $4,103,000 at the elementary school and $649,900 for the bus garage.

The district also will add air-conditioning for the high, middle and elementary schools at $285,600 per building or $856,800 total.

The HVAC and air conditioning projects will be funded 98 percent by the state, school officials said.

The boilers are all about 25 years old and are nearing the end of the their useful lives. If the district tried to fix a boiler or install air-conditioning outside of a capital project, Medina would have to pay 100 percent of the costs.

  • Information Technology – $380,000

The district wants to move the network operations center from the basement of the district office to Oak Orchard Elementary School.

The project will also add fiber optics to handle future needs as Medina moves to more electronic devices and on-line testing.

  • Academics/Programs at High School – $2,408,900

The project will include upgraded science rooms, renovations in library (by knocking out a wall and expanding to a next-door computer lab), replacing windows and renovating toilet facilities.

A pole barn will also be built for storage for marching band equipment (so no longer have to rent at Olde Pickle Factory).

The gym bleachers will be renovated, and JV softball and baseball fields will be upgraded. There also will be renovations in Ag Classroom and greenhouse.

The high school opened about 25 years ago and needs some work, especially with HVAC and to meet new state codes and technology needs, Kruzynski said.

  • Academics/Programs at Middle School – $1,028,000

The project includes renovations to the auditorium with stage floor, carpet, houselighting, some lighting and sound, and also some toilet renovations.

  • Academics/Programs at Elementary School – $2,085,600

The project includes auditorium renovations – carpet, seating, general, and improvements to toilets, new drinking fountains, classroom storage units with sinks, upgrades to the playground, and provisions to abate hazardous materials if any are found inside walls during the construction project.

  • Vet’s Park Site Work – $2,200,000 (part of $32.6 million Proposition 1)

Remove and replace turf that is 15 years old. The district also wants to improve drainage, complete sub-base reconstruction, replace fencing as needed, install a new scoreboard and sound system, add a new back stop and movable mounds for baseball and softball, reconfigure and expand the bleacher system and add new walkways.

  • Site work for track – $896,000

The track has already been resurfaced six times and the state won’t pay for another resurfacing but will aid a reconstruction of the site. The rebuilt track will have six lanes, event area, a scoreboard, and fencing and paving.

  • Site work for road from elementary to middle school – $3,012,700

A campus road will be constructed between Oak Orchard Elementary and Wise Middle School for bus traffic. The road will be heavy duty for buses.

The project includes demolition, removal and grading, as well as new sidewalks, stormwater management, parking and road lighting, removal of playground and construction of a new one for younger elementary-age students, and restored landscaping.

A new parking lot with room for 70-75 vehicles also will be added.

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Crafters create Christmas tree of quilt squares at Medina library

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 21 December 2016 at 1:54 pm
Photo by Tom Rivers: Catherine Cooper, director of Lee-Whedon Memorial Library in Medina, stands next to a tree created with 300 quilt squares.

Photo by Tom Rivers: Catherine Cooper, director of Lee-Whedon Memorial Library in Medina, stands next to a tree created with 300 quilt squares.

MEDINA – A year ago Lee-Whedon Memorial Library debuted a Christmas tree made of 175 quilt squares. That tree was so popular with library patrons that a new one was created this holiday season – with 300 quilt squares.

After New Year’s the tree will be taken down and the 10-inch squares will be used to make lap quilts for residents at local nursing homes and also at Hospice.

“There are many people in the community who are very crafty,” said Catherine Cooper, the library director. “This is a good way for them to use their talents and be generous.”

About 20 quilters created the 300 blocks for the “Giving” Christmas Tree. The tree was assembled by staff member Joy Cameron.

Lee-Whedon introduced a “Giving” Christmas Tree last year after being inspired by a similar project at a public library in Navan, Ireland. Last year’s tree featured knit and crochet squares that were donated to Roswell Park.

“Our library patrons are very generous and creative,” Cooper said. “These projects have had a great response. In addition, our Mitten Tree was overflowing this year with 184 items including 77 hand knit scarves.”

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Medina votes today on $34 million school capital project

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 21 December 2016 at 7:59 am
Photo by Tom Rivers: A Medina Mustang banner hangs outside on the district campus.

Photo by Tom Rivers: A Medina Mustang banner hangs outside on the district campus.

MEDINA – School district residents will decide today whether the school campus will receive $34 million in improvements.

Voting is from noon to 8 p.m. today at the District Office Board Room next to high school.

One proposition calls for $32,588,000 for a slew of improvements at all three school buildings, the bus garage, and Vet’s Park. There would also be a new access road between Oak Orchard Elementary School and Clifford Wise Middle School.

The other proposition for $1,425,000 would allow for an expansion at Vet’s Park by acquiring 1.6 acres of land south of the park, adding permanent bleachers, more lighting, a new press box in the bleacher system, new fencing and additional synthetic turf in the current press box location.

The project won’t increase local taxes because Medina already has $2,323,182 set aside in reserve funds for its share of the $34 million project, Tom Cox, interim school district superintendent, said at a public hearing last week.

“We feel we have been able to address the compelling needs,” Cox said at the public hearing. “It’s pretty much nuts and bolts but that doesn’t mean there isn’t some pretty nice stuff that will happen.”

To see a breakdown of the project, click here.

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Snappy in Medina ‘excited’ about opportunities with new owner

Photo by Tom Rivers: Snappy makes galvanized ducts, pipes and fittings in Medina at 214 Commercial St. The company was purchased by M&M Manufacturing.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 20 December 2016 at 5:31 pm

MEDINA – Snappy, a manufacturer in Medina with 36 employees, has been purchased by M&M Manufacturing, one of the country’s largest sheet metal producers.

“We’re very excited about it,” said Jeff Hessel, plant manager of Snappy in Medina. “We’re very positive about it.”

Snappy has roots that go back a century. Hessel said the new owner gives Snappy a stronger future.

“We want to be around another 100 years or more,” he said.

Snappy makes galvanized ducts, pipes and fittings for the residential HVAC market. Many of its employees have been with Snappy for more than 20 years, Hessel said.

He credited their dedication for the company’s “great products.” (Snappy also has a manufacturing site in Detroit Lakes, MN.)

Snappy will complement M&M’s sheet metal products, primarily servicing the air distribution and ventilation markets. M&M Manufacturing will invest in Snappy’s manufacturing capabilities, expertise, and infrastructure, according to an article in Business Wire (Click here). M&M Manufacturing is a subsidiary of MiTek Industries, Inc.

“We are excited to welcome Snappy in the family of MiTek companies,” Tom Manenti, Chairman and CEO of MiTek, told the Business Wire. “The experience and relationships of Snappy and M&M will be leveraged across all of our manufacturing platforms in order to expand capacity and customer service levels. Combining the manufacturing capacities of M&M Manufacturing and Snappy will allow both companies to better serve our customers and grow in the markets we serve together.”

Rob Felton, president of M&M Manufacturing, is expected in Medina next month to meet with the Snappy management team and employees.

“Snappy has been a market leader for more than 60 years,” Felton told Business Wire, “and Snappy’s reputation has been built on a heritage of great customer service, product innovation, and a focus on people. That’s a perfect fit for M&M Manufacturing, and we look forward to leveraging each others’ expertise and capabilities.”

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Medina places 56 wreaths for veterans at Boxwood Cemetery

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 19 December 2016 at 10:46 am

121916_wreaths

Provided photo

MEDINA – Medina participated in Wreaths Across America for the fourth time on Saturday when 56 wreaths were placed at veterans’ graves in Boxwood Cemetery.

The Honor Guard with representatives from local veterans’ organizations attended the ceremony at noon, and each veteran’s name was called out when a wreath was set at their grave.

“It’s a very moving ceremony when you listen,” said Kathy Blackburn, chairwoman of the Boxwood Cemetery Commission and local organizer of the Wreaths Across America. “Freedom is not free.”

Wreaths Across America has grown to 1,100 cemeteries in the country. Blackburn would like to reach 100 wreaths for Boxwood, and then expand the effort to include other local cemeteries. The wreaths cost $15 each.

Blackburn said the wreaths will remain at Boxwood after the New Year, and possibly until spring.

Boxwood has been part of Wreaths since 2013, when there were seven wreaths that first year. It grew to 20 in 2014 and 60 last year.

The wreaths can be purchased on-line (click here) or through Blackburn or the Village Clerk’s Office.

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Medina Rotary hears about rehab services at Orleans Community Health

Staff Reports Posted 15 December 2016 at 8:13 pm
121516_medinarotary

Provided photo

MEDINA – The Medina Rotary Club last week welcomed guest speaker Nancy Fallon, Director of Rehabilitation Services for Orleans Community Health. Fallon is pictured with Bill Bixler, president of the Medina Rotary Club.

Fallon explained that Orleans Community Health has two facilities in Orleans County, one at Lake Plains in Medina for all services and one in Albion for physical and occupational therapy.

Orleans Community Health’s Rehab Department is a CARF facility. CARF is the gold standard in the industry and stands for Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities. This national recognition states that Orleans Community Health has made a commitment to meet nationally recognized standards for quality and to continually seek excellence in its services and programs to create a foundation for the high level of patient satisfaction.

Fallon further explained that the Orleans facilities have a team approach to providing this care involving the physician, occupational and physical therapies, dietary and respiratory as indicated for each individual. While Acute Rehab may mean 3 hours of rehab per day, Sub-Acute with specific debilities may need an hour and a half per day. Both in-patient and out-patient services are available.

Medina Rotary member Jenn Hill reported that Thanksgiving supplies were delivered to a Medina family.

Bill Bixler reported on the success of the Parade of Lights, with Medina Rotarians selling out with food and beverages. The Rotary Club will begin participating and supporting a local food pantry. Other projects are being planned.

The club meets the first Wednesday each month at noon at the United Methodist Church (the former Apple Grove Inn).

For further information on Medina Rotary, contact any member.

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Medina school leaders seek public support for $34 million in upgrades

Photos by Tom Rivers: Mark Kruzynski, director of finance for Medina Central School, goes over $34 million in work to the school district as part of two propositions that go before voters from noon to 8 p.m. on Dec. 21. Voting is at the District Office.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 14 December 2016 at 10:27 am

MEDINA – District residents next Wednesday (Dec. 21) will vote on whether the district can move forward with two propositions totaling $34 million.

One proposition calls for $32,588,000 for a slew of improvements at all three school buildings, the bus garage, and Vet’s Park. There would also be a new access road between Oak Orchard Elementary School and Clifford Wise Middle School.

The other proposition for $1,425,000 would allow for an expansion at Vet’s Park by acquiring 1.6 acres of land south of the park, adding permanent bleachers, more lighting, a new press box in the bleacher system, new fencing and additional synthetic turf in the current press box location.

The district has the local share of the project in its reserves, so there won’t be a hike in local taxes for the project, Tom Cox, interim school district superintendent, said at a public hearing on Tuesday.

“We feel we have been able to address the compelling needs,” Cox told about a dozen people at a public hearing. “It’s pretty much nuts and bolts but that doesn’t mean there isn’t some pretty nice stuff that will happen.”

Cox and Mark Kruzynski, the district’s director of finance, said Medina worked with staff, the Board of Education, community members and an architect and construction firm to narrow the capital project from an initial list that topped $50 million.

Cox and Kruzynski detailed the project in a power point presentation on Tuesday.

Here is how they break down the project:

• Health, Safety and Code Compliance – $7,691,000

The district would replace aging bus lifts, upgrade the fire alarm systems, door hardware and toilets.

The roof, ceiling panels and wall panels would all be upgraded at the swimming pool.

Windows and a generator would be replaced at Oak Orchard Elementary School. Those windows are more than a half century old.

The project expenses are broken out to $3,637,300 at the elementary school, $2,562,400 at the middle school, $892,800 at high school, $561,500 at bus garage and $7,000 at concession stand.

• HVAC – $13,596,300

All three school buildings, as well as the bus garage, will have HVAC totally overhauled with $4,728,200 planned for the high school, $4,115,200 at the middle school, $4,103,000 at the elementary school and $649,900 for the bus garage.

The district also wants to add air-conditioning for the high, middle and elementary schools at $285,600 per building or $856,800 total.

The HVAC and air conditioning projects would be funded 98 percent by the state.

The boilers are all about 25 years old and are nearing the end of the their useful lives, Kruzynski said.

If the district tried to fix a boiler or install air-conditioning outside of a capital project, Medina would have to pay 100 percent of the costs.

• Information Technology – $380,000

The district wants to move the network operations center from the basement of the district office to Oak Orchard Elementary School.

The project would also add fiber optics to handle future needs as Medina moves to more electronic devices and on-line testing.

Tom Cox, Medina interim school superintendent, discusses the capital project on Tuesday evening during a public hearing in the high school auditorium. Only about a dozen people attended the forum.

Tom Cox, Medina interim school superintendent, discusses the capital project on Tuesday evening during a public hearing in the high school auditorium. Only about a dozen people attended the forum.

• Academics/Programs at High School – $2,408,900

The project would include upgraded science rooms, renovations in library (by knocking out a wall and expanding to a next-door computer lab), replacing windows and renovating toilet facilities.

A pole barn would also be built for storage for marching band equipment (so no longer have to rent at Olde Pickle Factory).

The gym bleachers would be renovated, and JV softball and baseball fields would be upgraded. There would also be renovations in Ag Classroom and greenhouse.

The high school opened about 25 years ago and needs some work, especially with HVAC and to meet new state codes and technology needs, Kruzynski said.

•  Academics/Programs at Middle School – $1,028,000

The project includes renovations to the auditorium with stage floor, carpet, houselighting, some lighting and sound, and also some toilet renovations.

• Academics/Programs at Elementary School – $2,085,600

The project includes auditorium renovations – carpet, seating, general, and improvements to toilets, new drinking fountains, classroom storage units with sinks, upgrades to the playground, and provisions to abate hazardous materials if any are found inside walls during the construction project.

• Vet’s Park Site Work – $2,200,000 (part of $32.6 million Proposition 1)

Remove and replace turf that is 15 years old. The district also wants to improve drainage, complete sub-base reconstruction, replace fencing as needed, install a new scoreboard and sound system, add a new back stop and movable mounds for baseball and softball, reconfigure and expand the bleacher system and add new walkways.

• Site work for track – $896,000

The track has already been resurfaced six times and the state won’t pay for another resurfacing but will aid a reconstruction of the site, Kruzynski said. The rebuilt track will have six lanes, event area, a scoreboard, and fencing and paving.

• Site work for road from elementary to middle school – $3,012,700

A campus road will be constructed between Oak Orchard Elementary and Wise Middle School for bus traffic. The road will be heavy duty for buses.

The project includes demolition, removal and grading, as well as new sidewalks, stormwater management, parking and road lighting, removal of playground and construction of a new one for younger elementary-age students, and restored landscaping.

A new parking lot with room for 70-75 vehicles also would be added.

• Proposition 2 for site work at Vet’s Park – $1,425,000

This is a separate proposition with its own vote. The district wants to acquire 1.6 acres south of current facility, which will allow bleachers and the press box to me pushed back farther from the field so there would be more room for permanent bleachers.

The district is negotiating to buy the land and the price is far less than $1,425,000, Kruzynski said.

Most of the proposition costs are for demolition, drainage, base work, as well as additional fencing, more permanent bleachers, a new press box, additional lighting and electrical needs, and landscape restoration.

The district already has $2,323,182 set aside in reserve funds for its share of the $34 million project.

For more on the capital project, click here.

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Medina churches enjoy playing Santa for 300 people

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 13 December 2016 at 4:44 pm

121316_maacpeggy

MEDINA – Peggy Murphy, a member of Holy Trinity Parish, sorts out toys for children this morning at Medina United Methodist Church, where many volunteers from the Medina Area Association of Churches are once again doing the annual holiday toy and food drive.

Community members filled 32 red barrels with toys, clothes and food.

The barrels were delivered this morning by Medina firefighters to the United Methodist Church, where volunteers are organizing the items.

121316_maacsylvia

Sylvia Riviere, a member of the Oak Orchard Assembly of God Church, is lead organizer of the toy and food drive.

“I like to see the kids have a Christmas,” she said. “It’s exciting to go through the barrels to see that the kids will be taken care of.”

MAAC will try to have two larger presents and two stocking stuffers for each child, as well as socks, mittens and a hat. Each family will also receive a Christmas dinner, including a ham.

There are 107 families signed up for the food and toy drive, and 48 senior citizens. The total number includes 149 kids and 161 adults. The number of children is down slightly from 151 last year, but the number of senior citizens has increased from 39 to 48.

121316_maacsue

Sue Metzo of the Presbyterian Church also has been an active volunteer with the food and toy drive for the past decade. She thanked community members for donating to the annual effort.

121316_maacsocks

Donna Joslyn and Sue DeHollander, both members of the Presbyterian Church, sort socks, mittens and hats. If there are any extras, some will be given to the nurses offices at Medina Central School.

“It’s our way of giving back to the community,” Joslyn said.

121316_maactables

The items are spread out on tables at the church, organized by age groups for children. Riviere, the leader of the drive, said there often aren’t enough gifts for pre-teens and teen-agers so MAAC will do some last-minute shopping for those kids.

121316_maacredbarrels

John Curtin of the Community Fellowship Church at Johnson Creek (left) and Gerald Grimes of the Faith Covenant Fellowship move food inside the church so it can be divvied up among families and senior citizens.

The items will be delivered this Saturday by local firefighters.

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