Find us on Facebook
Local Sports


4325 Terry’s Corners
4399 Lorraine Oakley
4365 Albion Youth Baseball
4396 Albion Merchants Association
4388 OC Democrats
4334 Genesee Symphony Orchestra
4342 Kevin Doherty
4387 OC Democrats
4414 Eileen Banker
0231 LCP Fishing Hotline
2374 Link to LCP
2308 I Saw It On The Hub
2192 LCP Printing Copying Services

Lyndonville

Lyndonville boy honored for helping mother after medical emergency

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 17 February 2018 at 2:19 pm

Photos by Tom Rivers

LYNDONVILLE – The Lyndonville Fire Department presented a certificate of appreciation this afternoon to Christopher Adkins Jr., 8, for his assistance on Jan. 29 when he mother was having a medical emergency at home.

Christopher was presented with the certificate and a gift card for $50 at Walmart. Fire Chief Ben Bane, left, hands Christopher with the award. He is joined by his parents, Misty and Chris Adkins, and Christopher’s younger brother, Austin. Other Lyndonville firefighters include Lee Kistner, second from right, and T.J. Heideman.

When his mother passed out from a medical emergency, Christopher quickly located his father in the basement of their home. Christopher brought his mother’s phone to his father and was ready to dial 911.

Christopher was able to give firefighters and EMTs background on how his mother was feeling that day, which helped firefighters to better understand her condition. He also was nurturing to his mother, said Lee Kistner, the second assistant chief.

“He was very caring with his mother, telling her ‘I love you,’ and ‘You’ll be alright,’” Kistner said.

Christopher Adkins, Jr. chats with Lyndonville firefighter Lee Kistner during a visit to the fire hall this afternoon.

With the certificate, Lyndonville firefighters thanked Christopher for his assistance on the emergency call to his home on Jan. 29.

“Your ability to remain calm, level headed, and recount details of the day were essential to getting your mother the help that she needed,” the certificate states.

Christopher’s father said he is impressed by his son’s actions that day.

“A lot of kids his age I don’t even think they know their address,” Mr. Adkins said. “He came and got me and had the phone. He was very brave.”

Return to top

Yates official says local law opposing industrial wind turbines protects rural character of community

Posted 11 February 2018 at 7:10 pm

Press Release, Town of Yates

YATES – The Yates Town Board amended its Wind Energy Facilities Law on Feb. 8, part of its ongoing effort opposing plans by Lighthouse Wind to install as many as 71 industrial wind turbines along shoreline communities in Orleans and Niagara counties.

“Since the Lighthouse Wind project was introduced in 2014, the Town Board has worked to learn as much as possible about the impacts and benefits of these industrial-scale projects,” said Town Supervisor Jim Simon.  “The amendments reflect that continuing effort, and in particular, the recommendations of two agencies well-placed to balance impacts and benefits.”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommends no wind turbines within three miles of the Lake Ontario shoreline for the Town of Yates in order to avoid possible severe impact on avian flyways and habitat, and the Vermont Public Service Board recommends turbine setback distances at residences such that, “…each turbine and any sound producing equipment located within the footprint of the turbine array shall be set back horizontally no less than ten times the turbine’s height as measured from the base to the tip of a blade in the upright vertical position.”

Additionally, the Town of Yates has performed an exhaustive, two-year setback study which has provided a statistical validation of the proposed setbacks.

“The Lighthouse Wind proposal for the Town of Yates is not appropriately sited,” Simon said.  “It does not protect and accommodate the concerns of the town, and is most definitely not consistent with all local laws and ordinances.”

The Town Board also unanimously approved a resolution on Feb. 8 reaffirming their formal opposition to the Lighthouse Wind project within the Town of Yates citing concerns about how the proposal would circumvent local control for siting large-scale industrial projects; how the project would create significant negative visual impacts from aesthetic points in the community and region; how the noise impacts in the current rural area would, based on World Health Organization standards and those recently adopted by the State of Vermont, negatively impact the health and the quality of life of residents.

In addition the Town Board said the proposed turbine project would introduce new hazards such as shadow flicker, ice shedding and blade throw; the project would present risks to the property values of adjoining property owners not part of the project; avian flyways and habitats and bat populations may be severely impacted as documented by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; the unacceptable possibility of encroachment on the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station could jeopardize operational mission effectiveness and make the air base subject to closure in the next Base Realignment and Closure Commission (BRAC); and there are significant wetland and other surface and sub-surface hydrological resources that would be negatively impacted by the large-scale terrain modification required for the project.

“We are called to protect the health, safety and welfare of our citizens for current and future generations and to preserve the rural, agricultural and leisure-based character of our community,” Simon said.

Return to top

Yates approves revised wind ordinance with farther setbacks for turbines, ban by lakeshore

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 9 February 2018 at 4:44 pm

YATES – The Yates Town Board has approved revisions to the town’s wind energy facilities law that bans wind turbines from within 3 miles of the Lake Ontario shoreline and also requires bigger property setbacks of at least a half mile.

The proposed revisions also insist turbines be quieter than the current regulations.

The Town Board passed the law on Thursday evening in a 4-1 vote. Wes Bradley voted no, while Town Supervisor Jim Simon and board members Harold Suhr, Jim Whipple and John Riggi approved it.

Taylor Quarles, project manager for the proposed Lighthouse Wind, said last month during an Orleans County Planning Board meeting that the Yates proposal represents “a wind energy ban.”

Apex Clean Energy wants to put as many as 70 turbines in Yates and Somerset that would be about 600 feet high as part of Lighthouse Wind.

Simon, the Yates town supervisor, said the bigger setbacks will protect “non-participating land owners” and help to preserve the rural nature and character of the town.

Simon said 3-mile buffer from the shoreline follows a recommendation from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which sees the 3-mile section along the shoreline as an important flyway for birds.

The changes in the Yates ordinance also include:

  • Reducing the allowable noise decibels to “residential receivers” from 45 during the day (7 a.m. to 8 p.m.) to 42, and from 40 at nighttime to 39 decibels. Simon said that follows recommendations from the Vermont Public Service Board for lower decibels. Simon said the turbine noise and “infrasound” can disturb sleep, causing negative health effects for people. The infrasound is a lower frequency of noise that can disrupt a person’s equilibrium, Simon said.
  • The setbacks from non-participating property lines was a minimum of 3 times the turbine height for land with houses or buildings, and 4.5 times the turbine height for vacant land. The change now increases the minimum setback to a half-mile (2,640 feet) or 6 times the turbine height, whichever is greater.
  • The setback from roads and public right-of-ways was a minimum of 1,800 feet or 3 times the height of a turbine. Yates has increased that to a half-mile or 6 times the turbine height.
  • The setback from the boundary of the Village of Lyndonville was 1,800 feet or 4.5 times a turbine height. Yates increased that setback to a minimum of 1 mile.
  • The setback from the boundaries from other towns was 1,800 feet or 3 times a turbine’s height. Yates now requires a half-mile setback or 6 times a turbine’s height, whichever is greater.
  • The setback from residences was 1,800 feet or 4.5 times a turbine height. Yates increased that to a half-mile or 6 times a turbine’s height.
  • In addition, Yates now has setbacks of 1 mile from schools, churches, and cemeteries. The town law didn’t include setbacks for those sites.

Return to top

Girl Scouts in Lyndonville get thanks from soldiers who received 56 boxes of cookies

Posted 8 February 2018 at 6:31 pm

Provided photo and article from Girl Scouts of WNY

LYNDONVILLE – Girl Scout Troop 82040 is selling cookies with a special goal once again. Last year, the girls in the troop decided to send their donated cookie purchases directly to American military troops stationed in Camp Arifjan in Kuwait.

The girls were able to send 56 boxes of cookies. The girls in the troop range from Kindergarten Daisy Scouts through Cadette Girl Scouts in middle school.

Troop co-leader Amanda Nowicki’s husband, Army Sergeant First Class Greg Nowicki, previously served with Chief Warrant Officer 2 Timothy Slaght, who at the time was deployed to Kuwait.

Nowicki encouraged the girls to support local deployed soldiers. The girls decided to send the cookies for the camp to enjoy. When the package arrived, the boxes were put in the mess hall for everyone to share. CW2 Slaght requested a flag be flown over the post in honor of the girls and was later sent to the Girl Scouts with a certificate as a thank you.

The girls used the money they earned from cookie sales for flowers in a memorial garden in honor of Elaina Webb, an Albion girl who passed away from leukemia a age 2 ½ on Feb. 7, 2017.

Navarra’s Greenhouse matched the number of flowers the Girl Scout troop purchased to ensure the garden would be lush and beautiful. The girls are planning another visit to Navarra’s to replenish the garden again this year.

The troop also used their cookie sale funds to attend Darien Lake for a day of play and a Kid’s Bop concert. They also used it for a Painting with a Twist class, a candy dish painting class at Brushstrokes in Medina, a Disney on Ice event in Buffalo, and are considering also using the money for membership dues in the upcoming scouting year. Girls that sold enough cookies were also able to attend a week of Girl Scout summer camp free of charge.

Throughout the year, the troop tries to work on a Girl Scout badge every meeting. The girls contribute a Christmas tree for the annual Lyndonville Christmas Tree Festival and march in the annual Lyndonville Fourth of July parade. They also try to do community service on a regular basis, including working on the community garden at a Lyndonville church and will be participating for their first time this summer in the annual FLED Foundation Kickball Tournament that supports children with leukemia and their families.

Troop 82040’s goal for this year is to get 100 cookie box donations for the Army, as well as an overall troop goal of 5,000 cookie boxes. They typically set up a cookie booth outside of Miller’s Amish Store in Lyndonville on Rt. 104.

Return to top

Soil & Water honors Yates farm for conservation practices

Photos by Tom Rivers: Gary and Nancy Thering accept the Agricultural Environmental Management (AEM) award for Conservation Farmer of the Year from Katie Sommerfeldt, the district technician for the Orleans County Sol & Water Conservation District.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 8 February 2018 at 9:37 am

Thering Family Farm works to protect soil, environment

Gary Thering thanked the Soil & Water staff for helping the farm implement many conservation practices.

GAINES – A Yates family that has been farming together on Millers Road since 1976 was honored on Wednesday for their years of conservation practices.

Gary and Nancy Thering grow corn, mixed hay and apples. They also  have 85 cows, 25 heifers, 42 calves and Black Angus bulls. The Therings are known for their mini straw bales. They designed and built a twine baler that turns 800-pound round straw bales into mini bales.

The Orleans County Soil & Water Conservation District honored the farm on Wednesday as the 2017 “Conservation Farmer of the Year.”

The farm has worked to optimize soil health and reduce erosion by installing drainage tile, rotating crops, and reducing chemical usage as part of Integrated Pest Management. The Therings target use of pesticides.

They built a covered feedlot and also an Agrichemical Handling and Mixing facility which reduces runoff.

“We never could have done it by ourselves,” Gary Thering said during a luncheon Wednesday at Tillman’s Village Inn.

He thanked the Soil & Water staff for their expertise in helping the farm implement many of the soil-saving practices. The Therings have worked with Soil & Water since 1999 to participate in the Agricultural Environmental Management program.

“We’re very, very grateful,” Thering said. “It makes our farm better. It makes our community better.”

Soil & Water presented these photos of Thering Family Farm, where Gary and Nancy have been farming together since 1976 on Millers Road.

During the meeting 73rd annual meeting of Soil & Water on Wednesday, staff reviewed accomplishments from 2017, which included:

• Surveying and designing 56 miles of drainage tile for farmers

• Working with local highway departments to survey and design 22 culvert replacements and 8,175 feet of drainage ditches

• Implementing Best Management Practices for several farms, with projects including two grassed waterways, a silage leachate collection and treatment system, a covered feedlot, 3,340 feet of exclusion fencing to keep livestock out of local streams, 55 acres of conservation cover, and 1,959 acres of cover crops

• Purchasing a new tractor and boom mower that was shared with the 10 towns, county and Oak Orchard Small Watershed Protection District to mow and clean drainage ditches throughout the county, which helps keep water moving and reduces flooding. The “Slashbuster” was used to clear and open up 17,315 feet of stream blockages.

• Soil & Water also was awarded several grants. One from the NYS Ag Non Point Source Pollution program helped pay for a covered feedlot for a local farm.

• Soil & Water also used 10 separate grants from the NYS Grown & Certified program for five variable rate sprayers, four micro irrigation systems, and one Agrichemical Handling Facility.

• The district also received funding the through the North Atlantic Aquatic Conductivity Collaborative program to assess 160 culverts in the lower Oak Orchard Watershed for structural integrity and aquatic conductivity (fish passage).

• The district also distributed 8,000 tree and shrub seedlings and transplants to 120 landowners for conservation practices.

• Soil & Water also runs a fish program and distributed 2,800 yearling bass, bluegill and minnows to seven farm fishpond owners, and also distributed 27 grass carp to four pond owners to help control nuisance weeds.

Return to top

County planners back Yates in revised wind ordinance with much bigger setbacks

Photos by Tom Rivers: Yates Town Supervisor Jim Simon addresses the Orleans County Planning Board on Thursday.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 27 January 2018 at 9:41 am

YATES – The Orleans County Planning Board voted in favor of revisions to the wind energy facilities law in Yates that would ban wind turbines from within 3 miles of the Lake Ontario shoreline and also require bigger property setbacks of at least a half mile. The proposed revisions also would insist turbines be quieter than the current regulations.

Taylor Quarles, project manager for Lighthouse Wind, said the changes represent “a wind energy ban” in Yates. Apex Clean Energy wants to put as many as 70 turbines in Yates and Somerset that would be about 600 feet high.

Town Supervisor Jim Simon said the proposal would keep the turbines away 3 miles from the lake and would protect homeowners from having the turbines too close.

Terry Brown, a County Planning Board member from Carlton, asked if there were any lots in Yates that would be big enough to accommodate a turbine under the proposed ordinance.

Taylor Quarles, project manager for the proposed Lighthouse Wind, said the Yates proposal represents “a wind energy ban.”

Even with the bigger setbacks, Simon said there is still land were the turbines could be located in Yates.

“There would still be locations in town (for turbines),” Simon told the County Planning Board. “We can’t ban them.”

He said the bigger setbacks will protect “non-participating land owners” and help to preserve the rural nature and character of the town.

Simon said 3-mile buffer from the shoreline follows a recommendation from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which sees the 3-mile section along the shoreline as an important flyway for birds.

But Quarles said Simon is misstating the Fish and Wildlife Service stance. That 3-mile buffer was for a project in Michigan, Quarles said.

(Somerset also is proposing a 3-mile buffer from the shoreline.)

The changes in the Yates ordinance also include:

• Reducing the allowable noise decibels to “residential receivers” from 45 during the day (7 a.m. to 8 p.m.) to 42, and from 40 at nighttime to 39 decibels. Simon said that follows recommendations from the Vermont Public Service Board for lower decibels. Simon said the turbine noise and “infrasound” can disturb sleep, causing negative health effects for people. The infrasound is a lower frequency of noise that can disrupt a person’s equilibrium, Simon said.

• The current setbacks from non-participating property lines is a minimum of 3 times the turbine height for land with houses or buildings, and 4.5 times the turbine height for vacant land. The proposed change increases the minimum setback to a half-mile (2,640 feet) or 6 times the turbine height, whichever is greater.

• The setback from roads and public right-of-ways is a minimum of 1,800 feet or 3 times the height of a turbine. Yates is proposing to increase that to a half-mile or 6 times the turbine height.

• The setback from the boundary of the Village of Lyndonville is currently 1,800 feet or 4.5 times a turbine height. Yates wants to increase that setback to a minimum of 1 mile.

• The setback from the boundaries from other towns is currently 1,800 feet or 3 times a turbine’s height. Yates is proposing a half-mile setback or 6 times a turbine’s height, whichever is greater.

• The setback from residences is currently 1,800 feet or 4.5 times a turbine height. Yates is proposing to increase that to a half-mile or 6 times a turbine’s height.

• In addition, Yates is now proposing setbacks of 1 mile from schools, churches, and cemeteries. The town law currently doesn’t include setbacks for those sites.

Paul Hendel, a County Planning Board member from Murray, said he expects Apex will legally challenge the Yates proposals. Hendel said he didn’t want to see the County Planning Board or county get pulled into a lawsuit.

“I respect every town’s right to enact local laws,” Hendel said. “But I want to protect the county and this board.”

Jim Bensley, the county’s director of Planning and Development, said the county should be immune from a lawsuit because it only issues advisory opinions.

The Planning and Development staff said research cited by Yates to back on the bigger setbacks is “credible and reliable.”

The state has created a Siting Board to review larger turbine projects. Apex hasn’t submitted a final application for Lighthouse Wind. Quarles said the company is hoping to submit a final application later this year for the project in Yates-Somerset, and also for one proposed in Barre.

The Siting Board could override the local wind energy ordinances.

“It remains to be seen whether the Article 10 siting board will respect the zoning of the communities that restrict wind developments of the scale that is being proposed,” County Planning and Development staff wrote in its review of the Yates ordinance.

Return to top

Local schools’ state aid less than 3% overall education boost proposed by governor

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 17 January 2018 at 10:57 am

Photo by Tom Rivers: The entrance to Lyndonville Central School is pictured recently. Lyndonville would see a 1.2 percent increase in funding, according to the governor’s proposed budget.

The governor’s budget includes a 3 percent increase in education funding for 2018-19. However, for Orleans County school districts the increase in foundation aid ranges from 1.0 to 1.4 percent.

Cuomo said his budget directs 70 percent of the proposed $769 million increase to poorer school districts.

For Orleans County districts, the proposed funding in foundation aid includes:

• Albion – $20,466,937, up 1.1 percent or $224,529

• Holley – $10,153,563, up 1.1 percent or $112,858

• Kendall – $7,644,017, up 1.0 percent or $79,346

• Lyndonville – $6,179,242, up 1.2 percent or $73,168

• Medina – $17,231,623, up 1.4 percent or $234,439

Foundation aid doesn’t include capital funding or the Smart Schools funding for technology upgrades. Albion and Medina also receive Community Schools Aid which includes $171,687 for Albion and $135,337 for Medina.

The governor’s proposed increase in education falls short of what was recommended by the Board of Regents.

“Preliminarily, we are pleased the Governor recommends funding many of the important initiatives he announced in his State of the State address – initiatives like expanding the reach of PreK and afterschool programs,” said Board of Regents Chancellor Betty A. Rosa and State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia. “We are, however, concerned with the recommended increase of $769 million in State Aid funding, which is less than half of that proposed by the Board of Regents. We need to invest in the education of all New York State students. The Regents State Aid request would ensure schools continue to improve and better prepare our children while also acknowledging the State’s fiscal realities.”

The State Legislature and governor will push to finalize the state budget before April 1. The state aid for education typically is increased from the governor’s proposals as part of the budget negotiations.

Return to top

Lyndonville school and library partnering with storytelling workshops

Staff Reports Posted 15 January 2018 at 11:59 am

Provided photo

LYNDONVILLE – The school district and the public library are partnering on a storytelling workshop series. Rick Merritt, the workshop instructor, is pictured with fourth-graders when the series kicked off on Jan. 2 at Yates Community Library. Merritt combines science and activities in the workshops. His other workshops will be at classrooms at the school.

He has been a frequent presenter at the library as part of a summer reading challenge.

Return to top

2 schools work with GCASA to step up drug prevention efforts

Photo by Tom Rivers: Diana Fulcomer, a prevention educator with the Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcohol and Substance Abuse, is pictured with Jason Smith, superintendent of Lyndonville Central School. Fulcomer has been spending at least a day of week at the district this school year.

By Tom Rivers, Editor Posted 15 January 2018 at 10:24 am

‘We’re trying to prevent kids from using the drugs that are killing people.’

Two school districts have increased the presence of prevention educators from the Genesee/Orleans Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse. Lyndonville and Medina both have GCASA staff in school buildings at least a day a week this school year. Diana Fulcomer has been working out of Lyndonville and Tracy Zakes has been connecting with Medina students.

“It’s been a great program,” said Jason Smith, superintendent of Lyndonville Central School. “I appreciate the partnership with GCASA.”

Fulcomer and Zakes have age-specific programs, as well as workshops for parents.

The educators teach students about the dangers of addictive substances. Fulcomer in some of her presentations focuses on making healthy choices, which includes getting enough sleep, eating nutritious foods and not spending too much time on social media.

Smith said he supports the expanded message – coping skills and making good choices.

“If the students are having issues with anxiety, we don’t want them turning to substances,” he said.

Lyndonville and Medina are both paying GCASA $3,500 this school year to have a prevention educator work out of the district.

Mark Kruzynski, Medina superintendent, said Zakes spends at least a day a week at the district. She meets with at-risk high schoolers and other students. She starts with students as young as third grade, teaching communication skills to those elementary students and urging them not to express their anger and frustration through violence.

“It’s going very well,” Kruzynski said about the partnership with GCASA. “Not only do we have the opioid epidemic, but kids today are exposed to so many things.”

Zakes some days spends a solid workday in the district, and other days might only be there a short time. Zakes has been a big asset in helping the district educate students about the dangers of drugs, he said.

“We’re trying to prevent kids from using the drugs that are killing people,” Kruzynski said.

Return to top

Lyndonville Leo Club collecting pet supplies for animal shelter

Staff Reports Posted 14 January 2018 at 7:02 pm

LYNDONVILLE – The Leo Club at Lyndonville Central School welcomes the community to drop off pet supplies at the main office of the school from Jan. 16-31. The school is located at 25 Housel Ave.

The supplies will be delivered to the Orleans County Animal Shelter, where students will also spend time with some of the cats and dogs at the shelter, 4125 Oak Orchard Rd., Albion.

The Leo Club welcomes used and new supplies. For more information, contact Aimee Chaffee at (585)765-2251 ext. 3143 or achaffee@lcsdk12.org.

Return to top

error: Content is protected !!